Monthly Archives March 2012

Daren Mansfield and Martin Osborne are the Business School librarians, working as a job share, with Daren working the first half of the week and Martin working the second half of the week.

Please email businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk for any of your enquiries and we shall get back to you promptly.

                        

Daren Mansfield                                 Martin Osborne

We can help you find relevant information in your chosen area of study, such as conducting literature reviews. We also provide advice on academic writing, structure, referencing and revision techniques. We are happy to arrange to meet with you on a one-to-one basis.

Additionally, we also hold drop-in sessions on the ground floor of the Business & Law building every Wednesday morning, support the Learning Development room on the ground floor of the Library, and have started to attend lectures across all subject areas.

Spirituality and business is certainly not widely discussed in mainstream academia, which is one of the reasons why I chose this particular title for March’s installment as the Book of the Month. Instrumental and utilitarian rationality rules the business world if you’ve ever wondered! Since the infamous Credit Crunch the ethics of capitalism has been questioned, as  indeed has its sustainability. Just look at the furore between Canada and the EU over the extraction of the toxic tar sands oil. Some might say that the foundations of capitalism have not been fundamentally examined and that trust is broken. Conditions are certainly ripe for revolution: The current state of the Eurozone, quarrels over the Greek bail-out, downgrading of economies, austerity measures, recession, hiking inflation, and increasing unemployment compound any discussion. Overcoming socioeconomic problems is a tall order. Some argue there may be another way of making money, instead of the relentless pursuit of wealth, and Bouckaert and Zsolnai’s The Palgrave Handbook of Spirituality and Business  (2011) suggests such alternatives. 

Workplace spirituality is conscious of avoiding overexploitation of the planet’s resources and stands outside of institutionalized religion. The challenge of sustainability, which includes greening of industry and the ‘self-restricting of needs’, is labelled ‘postcapitalism’ by Bouckaert and Zsolnai (2011: p.6), who explain that ‘business ethics as a system of moral self-regulation fuelling relations of trust and good reputation’ which effectively criticizes the ‘opportunistic tendencies within business’ (Bouckaert and Zsolnai, 2011: 4) . Cultivating distance is a necessary condition for any progressive organisation in the decision-making process, and spirituality may solve the current ‘ethical deficit in business ethics’ because it is ‘an inner experience of deep interconnectedness with all living beings’ which ‘opens a space from the pressures of the market and the routines of business-as-usual’ (Bouckaert and Zsolnai, pp. 4-5).

 There’s lots in this book – some of the most eye-catching essays cover Islamic Economics (Feisal Khan), Quaker Spirituality and the Economy (Laurie Michaelis), Voicing Meaningfulness at Work (Marjolein Lips-Wiersma and Lani Morris), and the thought-provoking chapter Multinational Companies and the Common Good (Francois Lepineux and Jean-Jacques Rose), a concept which even stretches back to Plato’s time.

The book is available at 201.73 pal in the Library if you would like to read more on this fascinating and relatively unexplored topic…

To make it easier to find FAME (Financial Analysis Made Easy) we have added the database to the electronic journals a-z on the Library Catalogue. Search for the financial information of over three million companies in the UK and Ireland by going to the Library Catalogue and selecting Electronic Journals A-Z:

 You will be able to access the database from here:

 

The Creative Review Handbook has ceased publication. However there is a web site available at: www.chb.com

It seems to be free to view and is continuing for the foreseeable future.

This is advance notice that effective 30 June 2012, The Economist will no longer be available in academic library subscriptions to Factiva.

However, you will still be able to access The Economist via our subscription to ABI/Inform without embargo.

If you would like any help accessing any of the databases available to you please email Daren Mansfield or Martin Osborne at businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk

 

Having trouble accessing the Portal off campus? This short video takes you through the various steps to gain access to the Portal’s electronic resources…

Have you ever wondered what your preferred learning style is? Help your revision techniques by downloading and completing this questionnaire, then read about your dominant learning style below. Techniques drawn from your learning style will enable you to revise more efficiently and tackle your exams with greater confidence.

3 Study Methods

Cadbury creme eggs 6 29th February 2012 leap day 21:07.07pm

When: Wednesday 14th March 11am – 1pm

Where: The Library’s Learning Development Room

What: Free chocolate eggs for answering a couple of mutiple choice referencing questions

Why: As part of the Festival of Teaching and Learning

Its all about promoting the service that we offer in the Learning Development room where you can come along at any of the times listed below to gain help with anything to do with Learning Development:

  • Monday      10.00 – 12.00
  • Tuesday     14.00 – 16.00
  • Wednesday 11.00 – 13.00
  • Thursday    14.00 – 16.00
  • Friday         10.00 – 12.00 

We offer help with finding information and using resources, essay writing and structure, revision techniques and more.

We look forward to seeing you!

 

 

Some of you, like me, have been experiencing problems accessing Science Direct. A message saying ‘Sorry, your request can’t be processed due to a system problem’ appears when you try to log on.  However, if you select the ‘Search’ tab at the top of the screen then you should be able to use the database without hindrance. The problem has been reported and we hope that it is resolved shortly.

Having trouble finding historical Tourism statistics? Marketline on the e-library section of the Portal might well be what you are looking for. You can download spreadsheets of really useful information from this database with archives going back twenty years. If you wish, you can select the full screen option to play this audio video at the bottom right hand corner of the screen.