Monthly Archives April 2015

An interesting book caught my eye this week written about the industry of ghost tourism which is neatly defined as ‘any form of leisure or travel that involves encounters with or the pursuit of knowledge of the ghostly or haunted’ (Hanks, 2015: 13). Michele Hanks’ Haunted Heritage is located at  306.4819 han on the first floor and covers the subject of commercial and non-profit ghost walks. So-called dark tourism has really taken off in recent years, with several students over the past few years writing dissertations about the topic (even Lincoln offers its own ghost walk). I have no doubt that a few tourism and events students will find this book interesting. Naturally there is caution surrounding this area, particularly in academic circles, as Hanks (2015, 177) suggests that there is no certainty that a ‘ghost haunts a particular site’ and ‘it is always a matter of belief, speculation, or legend’. Not known to be staunch believer himself ( il n’y a pas de hors-texte, “there is no outside-text”), French Algerian philosopher Jacques Derrida (1994, 11 cited in Hanks, 2015) reiterated this position when he famously outlined academic convention after observing that:

‘there has never been a scholar who really, and as a scholar, deals with ghosts. A traditional scholar does not believe in ghosts – nor in all that could be called the critical space of spectrality. There has never been a scholar who, as such, does not believe in the sharp distinction between the real and unreal, the actual and the inactual, the living and the non-living, being and non-being’.

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Even if one does not believe in ghosts, it is unquestionable that a thriving ghost tourism industry is alive and well!

In addition to my earlier post about EthOs, the British Library’s digitised theses service where over 140,000 theses are available for download, the British Library launched a prestigious #ShareMyThesis competition where competitors challenged each other on Twitter to inventively summarise their thesis in 140 characters and write a 600 word summary. The top prize went to Sarah Wiseman, who now works as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University College London and Open University for the passionate tweet #ShareMyThesis Typing numbers wrongly in hospitals can kill people. Understanding why it happens can help design better systems and stop it!  Sarah’s outstanding thesis is available here…yet another reason why EthOs is worth exploring, which is found under our database section (library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > databases > E > EthOs…)

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Capture sarah theSarah Wiseman, winner of #Sharemythesis competition.

Not many people may be aware of the incredible service that the British Library is now offering in terms of digitising theses across the UK and uploading them onto a database called EthOs. Fortunately the University of Lincoln does subscribe to this facility where you can download or order a copy, and we are proudly able to claim that some 350 of its PhD theses are available on EthOs.  These links can be easily be shared via a plethora of social media such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc…

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We are hoping that Nono Wibisono’s recent PhD entitled ‘Destination image: perception, experience and behavioural intent in the context of West Java, Indonesia as a tourist destination’ is soon added to EthOs as it’s certainly worth reading. This thesis is currently being added to the University of Lincoln’s hard-copy theses collection on the ground floor of the Library, behind the issue desk. Whatever your level of study I find it a useful exercise to browse through a PhD thesis to appreciate the depth of a literature review, how the references are threaded together in a logical debate and learn how to write in an academic style, of which Wibisono’s is a fine example.

Just to let you know that our More Books service for undergraduate students will be closing on the 15th May, so if you want a book to be added to the library collection please submit your request before this deadline. More Books for Research will remain open for postgraduate students and researchers and is available at http://lncn.eu/pu57.

The More Books service for undergraduates will return in the Autumn.

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 http://library.lincoln.ac.uk/home/more-books/

The Business Librarian blog has been successfully up and running since August 2011 and at that time we looked for inspiration from a range of blogs, which included Judge Business School at Cambridge University and the University of Exeter’s business librarian blog. I found that their sophisticated use of information, graphics and selected feeds was definitely the way to go, but it’s a good idea to notice what blogs exist further afield.

Blogging is such an important phenomenon that the top bloggers from across the UK assemble for the National UK Blog Awards where the Virtual World is recognised. It’s worth checking out some of the nominated blogs to gain an insight into this form of social media and perhaps acquire some inspiration if you’re interested in the design, content and ideas behind some outstanding blogs. Though not on the list of nominations my personal favourite blog, or rather daily addiction, is Ian Dunt’s splendid politics.co.uk . From the nominated list it is worth looking at Kate Russell’s blog on ICT who was voted top blog in the individual digital and technology category this year.

http://www.blogawardsuk.co.uk/

Ever wished there were more hours in the day to study in our Library? Well, this is a reminder to all those students completing their dissertations and assignments, and starting to revise for exams, the Library is still open 24-7 until 15th May.

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http://library.lincoln.ac.uk/home/customer-information/opening-times/#247

Have you ever wondered how to make referencing a a whole lot easier? Refworks is an online bibliographic tool that organises and then formats your references and all it takes is a few moments to set up an account – see below for a quick tutorial. Plus the University of Lincoln’s version of Refworks has a full range of referencing styles which also incorporates our very own Harvard Referencing guide:

Marketline is a very popular database used for market research purposes where researching country information, industry and company profiles is available. It is also good for international business for students wishing to find out about businesses outside of the United Kingdom. Please view Marketline’s video which gives an overview of the database, and an insight into its formidable potential. I would recommend some investigation into the database section of Marketline where you can generate some very interesting and unique charts, such as one I have just conducted on broadband activity in Afghanistan.  Why not try to generate a chart to test Marketline’s impressive archive?

How do you learn new words and especially use academic language suited to a university? Expanding your vocabulary can make writing assignments easier and more enjoyable.  Here are a couple of tips:

  1. Firstly it is important to read as extensively as you can; absorb the language used in a scholarly journal article. Get into the ideas the author (s) is expressing and learn how to convey an academic argument.
  2. When searching a scholarly database like Science Direct take note of the language used and how the paper is written. Investigate the themes and how they are threaded together to deliver a convincing argument, or not (!).
  3. Buy a good quality dictionary and an extensive thesaurus to identify synonyms and antonyms. Remember to always keep them at your side when you are drafting your assignments.
  4. Read a quality newspaper like the Guardian or Independent regularly.  Newspapers are subsidised at the SU shop in the Main Building.
  5. For the slightly more ambitious reader fine literature penned from literary masters like Donne, Faulkner, Montaigne, Tolstoy, Zola or Flaubert to name just a few would be worth delving into, and get inspired to write more fluently.
  6. For anyone interested in the power of the written word it is certainly worth regularly visiting Maria Popova’s well-crafted Brain Pickings blog and particularly her piece on Kurt Vonnegut called ‘How to Write with Style: Kurt Vonnegut’s 8 Keys to the Power of the Written Word‘.

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screenshot of the most renowned thesaurus available….

I’ve just  attended some preliminary training on the referencing software EndNote, which would ideally suit researchers and those committed to longer-term research projects and developing specialisms.  You can use EndNote  to search for keywords, retrieving results and viewing the abstract. The references are then stored under tagging (‘labels’) and establishing themed groups. It is similar to our other referencing software, Refworks  but is probably more aimed at higher level students or researchers.  I was particularly impressed by the way a user could find freely available pdfs within the collated references, rating the article, the flexibility it offered, the use of ‘sticky notes’, and an easy keyword search within the references. You can find EndNote on university pcs (start > all programs > EndNote). There are some videos from endnote.com that will help you if you want to use EndNote.

For Windows:

For Macs:

 

 

 

 

 

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Josh Zhang, our Library International Co-ordinator, has launched a blog aimed at improving the international student experience at the University of Lincoln. Today, Josh has published his first post outlining his role and his hopes for further supporting the library and research needs of international students.

欢迎大家来关注 (‘welcome to follow our blog’ in Mandarin).

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http://internationallibrary.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/2015/04/08/library-support-for-international-students/

This new video, produced by Helen Williams (Academic Subject Librarian for work-based distance learners & Law), will help anyone wishing to research databases to find relevant journal articles. Highly recommended!

I’m nearing the end of the University of Lincoln’s Teaching and Learning in a Digital Age (TELEDA) course having started the course last October. We consumed a veritable feast of social media (Twitter, Delicious, LinkedIn, Pin Interest, blogs, wikis, screencasts) as well as keeping a reflective diary about our learning journey. This engagement contributed towards an eportfolio which holds evidence of activities, reflections, scholarly research and so forth.  It’s certainly reinvigorated my interest in recording screencasts which I have routinely added to this blog, and I definitely feel more confident in engaging with social media, which happened to be my original aim of enrollment.  Without knowing it at the time,  I achieved the wonderfully titled term ‘transliteracy‘ which is the ability to write across several platforms.

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http://edeu.lincoln.ac.uk/educational-development/teleda/

If you’re interested in digital literacy then it’s worth watching the latest Jonathan Dimbleby lecture by digital guru Martha Lane Fox broadcast last month:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b05p9tvt/the-richard-dimbleby-lecture-30032015