New reading list look – today! 

Talis Reading lists has upgraded to a ‘New List View’ today (ahem, Wednesday 16th January 2019). This is designed to improve usability for all users, which includes images of the front cover widely considered as the most obvious change. Here is an example of the ‘New List View’, if you would like to take a look:

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New database includes millions of research papers now available

CORE currently contains 125,700,569 open access articles, sourced from over tens of thousands of journals, collected from over 3,673 repositories around the world. Their mission is to aggregate all open access research outputs from repositories and journals worldwide and make them available to the public, enabling free unrestricted access to research for all.

New eBook platform: Ebook Central

We have recently acquired EBook Central, which is a vast collection of electronic books that significantly boosts our business library provision. It is easy to use and indeed, colourful – you are able to limit your results by selecting the left-hand side of the page, including by author. Please provide us with some feedback about this new acquisition.

Go to eBook Central via http://guides.library.lincoln.ac.uk/find/ebooks or http://guides.library.lincoln.ac.uk/ebookcentral

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Introducing our new New eBook database…Bibliotech

We are delighted to announce a new accessible-friendly eBook platform, Bibliotech, which is available via the Library website > Find > Databases > B > Bibliotech.  At the moment it includes several study skills eBooks which you are welcome to download, and in the near future we hope to expand this collection to cover high-demand books, some of which have not been available as electronic versions before. This is a major step forward in being able to deliver our most popular  print titles in an electronic format, and eliminating the stress of waiting in a queue for a highly-prized core text book that it is always on loan.

 

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Interested in looking for journals? Use BrowZine

We have a new wonderful facility where anyone (well, anyone with electronic access to the University Library) is able to browse an enormous range of journals, categorised under subject headings. One of the things we like is the colourful graphics that tempts the user to explore a diverse range of subjects.
All you need to do is go to the Library website > Find > Browse Electronic Journals and select a subject area, which would probably be Business and Economics but of course, you are free to access any of the other areas. We hope you like it. We do.

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Use Read & Write Gold for proofreading your assignment

Interested in someone proofreading your assignment or dissertation?  Then grab your headphones.

Read & Write Gold (version 10) is under All Programs > Accessories > TextHelp Systems – Read & Write Gold.

You then launch the toolbar and scroll over the text before pressing the green play button. It’s as simple as that!

 

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Using digital textbook analytics as a formative assessment tool

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It is the Holy Grail of understanding student progress: whether tutors can predict student outcome. It was, until recently, more unusual to use textbooks as a method of assessment but the digital era has changed all that. Now academic achievement progress can be pinned down to percentages, charts and reports throughout the year.

The advent of digital textbooks is a relatively new phenomenon that is revolutionising the publishing world, as authors go straight to electronic format, before any print books are published. This gives the publishers some indicative analysis whether they’re going to sell or not, and inform the decision to publish in hard copy.

Digital textbooks are also an ideal platform to uncover a plethora of learning analytics (which is the “measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs” according to Siemens 2010, cited in Junco & Clem, 2015, 54) such as formative assessment. How do they work? Naturally, reading textbooks is an integral part of study, but the particular gift of digital textbooks is that they record quiz scores, student engagement (completing exercises, et al), significantly the number of annotations and highlighting, time spent reading outside of office hours, and time spent re-reading (i.e. the retention of knowledge). Their interactivity provides a welcome contrast to a traditional assessment model that is primarily summative; marking essays at the end of the term, or taking exams and so forth. It is a form of academic monitoring, particularly understandable in the context when electronic registers for seminars are so commonplace, and electronic surveillance is routine.  More research needs to be carried out to find reliable data on learning analytics and digital textbooks, but I find it a fascinating area and one that will no doubt become more and more popular across universities as tutors become more aware of their capability. Where does that leave libraries? Hopefully involved.

Reference list

Junco, R. & Clem, C. (2015). Predicting course outcomes with digital textbook usage data. Internet and Higher Education. Vol. 27, 54–63.

Siemens, G. (2010). 1st international conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge. Available from: https://tekri.athabascau.ca/analytics/. [accessed 21st March 2017].

 

Adding references to Refworks using the new library system

Step 1. To add references to the new Library system it is best to log into Refworks first.

Step 2: Elect a separate tab and open the Library website then run a keyword search such as ‘change counselling’.

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Step 3: Choose Refworks from the list

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Step  4: Import references

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Step 5: Import references to New Folder or existing Folder

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Our virtual out of hours enquiry service

We will be joining the SCONUL virtual out-of-hours enquiry service, based on the OCLC QuestionPoint service. The service allows libraries to offer a 24 hour, 365 days a year enquiry service, meaning that there will be a integrated chat and e-mail provision. As an interesting aside, I have embedded a video about how a library used the service in compiling digitised photographs of early 20th century Filipino coffee shops.

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Access to the Financial Times ePaper

CapturefthAs part of our subscription we have full access to the FT ePaper – an exact digital replica of the FT Newspaper.  The FT ePaper is now even easier to use on your computer, tablet and phone. The FT have upgraded it with great new features and functionality, including:

  • Offline access, without needing to download a pdf
  • Pinch-and-zoom viewing, for easy reading on your mobile
  • A clear, streamlined contents menu, making it easy to choose and click on articles

When you access the ePaper the on-screen tool tips will guide you through what’s new, or just click on the ? icon in the top menu. Why does this matter? Just check out this video ‘Punk FT – EU models for a post-Brexit UK‘ as a real gem available online about the options for the UK post-Brexit. This question ultimately revolves around the free movement of labour versus goods, as the UK considers a journey without trade agreements with the remaining EU members.

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Reading the Financial Times online today

There’s never been a better day than today to watch events unfold than by reading the Financial Times online. At the University we have unlimited access to FT.com whose sections like Alphaville  (it will ask for your university username and password) tracks the markets and an invaluable online forum. For instance, nougats like Jan Hilbebrand’s article on a secret Brexit plan (yes, one really does exists) is worth seeking out, saying that Germany’s Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble has already made preparations for a Brexit. Also the fastFT (“a global team working across timezones to give you market-moving news and views twenty-four hours a day, five days a week”) is an excellent tool to follow today’s news as it appears ‘live’.  The housing market, the Pound, stocks and shares, investment, the FTSE  and spread betting are news stories just from the past hour as Brexit hits the financial markets.

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Video tutorial on how to search for books and journals

This video that was produced by Helen Williams, the Academic Subject Librarian for distance learners in the Lincoln International Business School, shows you how to find books and journals using the Library homepage at library.lincoln.ac.uk.

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The four benefits of Google Docs

Saving the right version of a document as been a headache for me over the years. Things all over the place. Edited versions bumping into each other and overlapping occasionally. I resisted using one platform, but it exists. So I’m happy to announce my recent Damascene conversion to Google Docs. Free to use, you don’t need Word or Office at home and you can be sure that you have the right version of your document in the right place, at the right time. (You can export your file to Word if you wish). All you need is a Google Docs account which you can create easily and within seconds. It linked to my work profile on gmail so I didn’t to set anything up. Google Docs allows you to to type papers, create digital presentations, and share documents. It’s four great features includes auto-save (hurrah!), which means that you don’t lose any work, and you can share your documents with other Google Doc Users which means you are able to collaborate and use feedback too. Lastly all you need is Internet access. It’s simple, straightforward and stress free. And a relief.

You can also create multiple folders too, which means that you can use it as a separate drive and not worry about unreliable or lost memory sticks, passwords or so forth. I’ve started, and I think it’s an easy solution to the disorientation of having many files in different places and which came first. No longer a problem!

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Finding research output for Lincoln International Business School

Fresh on the heels of yesterday’s post about following the University of Lincoln’s Repository (@eprintslincoln) it may be worth checking out what’s included in the archive. I found that  it was easier to find items by searching University Structure and then scrolling down to find that the Lincoln Business School (1151) has the most uploads on the system, with the University of Lincoln amassing 13355 records in all, and an incredible 502 for this year so far (1112 for 2015). See below for a screenshot of how the Repository structure looks. Alternatively, there is a detailed advanced search facility on the home page and a useful Latest Additions to the Lincoln Repository option there too. For instance, Matthew Cragoe’s (2016) The Church of England and the enclosure of England’s Open Fields: a Northamptonshire case study. International Journal of Regional and Local History, 11 (1). pp. 17-30 was uploaded only yesterday.

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Follow Lincoln Repository’s Twitter feed @eprintslincoln

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The Twitter feed  of our Lincoln Repository is regularly updated with such interesting uploads it’s worth following @eprintslincoln. You can keep up to date with the University of Lincoln’s latest research such as Gary Bosworth et al’s (10th June upload) paper on Identifying social innovations in European local rural development initiatives which caught my eye and inspired this blog post; about how social innovations are tackling Europe-wide austerity in rural areas. If you’re interested in this paper, you’ll need to request a copy whereas Olaoye, Olanrewaju Akanbi’s (2015) Collaborative governance: The case of mass transportation in London and Lagos is available for download, a PhD thesis which, in part concludes, the central importance of  the dialogue between the Mayor of London @SadiqKhan and the Governor of Lagos State, @AkinwunmiAmbode in establishing sustainable mass transportation between the two mega cities.

 

 

 + View full record

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http://eprints.lincoln.ac.uk/20075/