Posts tagged Cheryl Cliffe

April’s eye-catching contribution to Book of the Month is Pino Bethencourt’s ‘Success in six cups of coffee: How smart networking conquers hidden obstacles’ (2011). I nominated this snappy title because it leaped out from other new book arrivals in the library, not only because of its obvious use to business students, but that networking is a fundamental life skill relevant to all of us. As Bethencourt (2011: 4; 5) advises that ‘networking is perhaps the most critical skill for success in any executive’, suggesting that ‘good networking is useful for almost any goal in life: finding a wife or husband, planning the perfect vacation, selling your house or learning Chinese’. The fabled six degrees of separation is a proven technique to build purposeful relationships; six encounters where bonds are formed. Cultivating a diverse network of contacts ultimately boils down to confidence, as always. If you possess confidence then everything else follows. Taking advantage of every new human interaction might sound opportunistic, even cynical, but realising your networking potential by analysing your relationships and recognising your personal qualities, having a relaxed attitude, avoiding hard-sell, developing high-trust healthy relationships, showing understanding and care, knowing the benefits of socializing, making friends, building influence, knowing your strengths and weaknesses, becoming self-aware, demonstrating patience, and acknowledging the need to change, are valued qualities in any person. It’s also about taking personal responsibility, turning your world around so that you are empowered enough to influence your world rather it influencing you.

Bethencourt (2011: 3) postulates that the need for human connection in business is perhaps more natural than exploitative money-making: ‘Bonding is a millenary ritual of intimate exchange that requires attention to detail and respectful care’. Because it is natural it builds self-confidence too. There a lot of insightful psychology here, as Bethencourt (2011: 36)  identifies a fine line between being authentic and generating interest: ‘The law of reciprocity has been playing a key role in every relationship you’ve established up to now, even if it doesn’t show’. Six cups of coffee goes beyond face-to-face interaction. Bethencourt explores how human trust can develop over keypads and screens via an interview with Erik Wachtmeister, founder of the online communities ‘A Small World’ and ‘Best of all worlds’, the latter specialising in bringing together niche communities, with every chapter ending in a personal interview with an executive.  Bethencourt offers advice on telephone and email manner, valuing the ‘power of now’, personal SWOT analysis, and handling rejection through self-assessment rather than concentrating upon victimisation that only results in avoidance rather than honest action. Part of the success companies within BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China), for instance, lies within the recognition that they could not compete in mature markets (USA, UK, Netherlands, etc) so new markets evolved with double digit growth. Recognising strength and weaknesses is still a vital strategy in any business venture.

An example of understanding networks was illustrated by Greenpeace’s campaign against Japanese whaling.  Not realising that whale meat had saved the Japanese population from starvation after the second world war, they were inadvertently insulting the Japanese. So, they were advised to change their strategy to the more successful ‘now it is time for the Japanese to save the whales in return’ resulting in a globally publicised animation movie  (Bethencourt (2011: 79).

This book is located at 650.13 bet on the 2nd floor of the Library.

Spirituality and business is certainly not widely discussed in mainstream academia, which is one of the reasons why I chose this particular title for March’s installment as the Book of the Month. Instrumental and utilitarian rationality rules the business world if you’ve ever wondered! Since the infamous Credit Crunch the ethics of capitalism has been questioned, as  indeed has its sustainability. Just look at the furore between Canada and the EU over the extraction of the toxic tar sands oil. Some might say that the foundations of capitalism have not been fundamentally examined and that trust is broken. Conditions are certainly ripe for revolution: The current state of the Eurozone, quarrels over the Greek bail-out, downgrading of economies, austerity measures, recession, hiking inflation, and increasing unemployment compound any discussion. Overcoming socioeconomic problems is a tall order. Some argue there may be another way of making money, instead of the relentless pursuit of wealth, and Bouckaert and Zsolnai’s The Palgrave Handbook of Spirituality and Business  (2011) suggests such alternatives. 

Workplace spirituality is conscious of avoiding overexploitation of the planet’s resources and stands outside of institutionalized religion. The challenge of sustainability, which includes greening of industry and the ‘self-restricting of needs’, is labelled ‘postcapitalism’ by Bouckaert and Zsolnai (2011: p.6), who explain that ‘business ethics as a system of moral self-regulation fuelling relations of trust and good reputation’ which effectively criticizes the ‘opportunistic tendencies within business’ (Bouckaert and Zsolnai, 2011: 4) . Cultivating distance is a necessary condition for any progressive organisation in the decision-making process, and spirituality may solve the current ‘ethical deficit in business ethics’ because it is ‘an inner experience of deep interconnectedness with all living beings’ which ‘opens a space from the pressures of the market and the routines of business-as-usual’ (Bouckaert and Zsolnai, pp. 4-5).

 There’s lots in this book – some of the most eye-catching essays cover Islamic Economics (Feisal Khan), Quaker Spirituality and the Economy (Laurie Michaelis), Voicing Meaningfulness at Work (Marjolein Lips-Wiersma and Lani Morris), and the thought-provoking chapter Multinational Companies and the Common Good (Francois Lepineux and Jean-Jacques Rose), a concept which even stretches back to Plato’s time.

The book is available at 201.73 pal in the Library if you would like to read more on this fascinating and relatively unexplored topic…

To make it easier to find FAME (Financial Analysis Made Easy) we have added the database to the electronic journals a-z on the Library Catalogue. Search for the financial information of over three million companies in the UK and Ireland by going to the Library Catalogue and selecting Electronic Journals A-Z:

 You will be able to access the database from here:

 

The Creative Review Handbook has ceased publication. However there is a web site available at: www.chb.com

It seems to be free to view and is continuing for the foreseeable future.

Having trouble accessing the Portal off campus? This short video takes you through the various steps to gain access to the Portal’s electronic resources…

Have you ever wondered what your preferred learning style is? Help your revision techniques by downloading and completing this questionnaire, then read about your dominant learning style below. Techniques drawn from your learning style will enable you to revise more efficiently and tackle your exams with greater confidence.

3 Study Methods

Some of you, like me, have been experiencing problems accessing Science Direct. A message saying ‘Sorry, your request can’t be processed due to a system problem’ appears when you try to log on.  However, if you select the ‘Search’ tab at the top of the screen then you should be able to use the database without hindrance. The problem has been reported and we hope that it is resolved shortly.

If you’re wondering how to compare currencies then Factiva (Portal > Library > E-Library > Factiva) will provide you with some answers:

Go to Companies / Markets and choose currencies. Then choose from the drop-down menus the currencies you want to compare. You can obtain the current quote or the historical quote, daily, weekly or monthly price, and choose the date range (anything up to 2 yrs) then ‘get quote’. 

 

Results are shown in a spreadsheet or (scroll to the bottom of the screen) in an interactive chart. I compared daily prices between the US dollar with the Belize Dollarper for the past three months:

  

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The library will be opening 24/5 from 4 March – 30 March and 22 April – 11 May (to cover the revision period).

This means that from noon on Sunday until 10pm on Friday the Library will be open continuously to give you more time to study, use resources or just find a quiet place to take some time out.

 

 

Box of Broadcasts is a shared off-air recording and media archive service where subscribers (the University of Lincoln is this case) can record forthcoming television and radio programmes as well as retrieving programmes from the previous week.

You can set up an account to request programmes and create clips to embed into Blackboard. Logging into the site on the Portal is slightly unusual – for details see Paul Stainthorp’s blog post:

http://paulstainthorp.com/2010/12/20/logging-on-to-bob/

Zenith Television Set, 1977

Struggling with grammar? Do you know the difference between present and third person indicative’?

Anyone who has watched Monty Python’s The Life of Brian (1979) may know the reference. The brilliant sketch (Romanes Eunt Domus) between a pedantic Roman soldier (John Cleese) and the luckless Brian (Graham Chapman), when Brian is reprimanded after daubing Latin graffiti on a Jerusalem wall, acknowledges the baffling and occasionally obsessive idiosyncracies of proper grammar. Fortunately the surprise bestseller Eats, Shoots & Leaves (2003) by Lynne Truss humorously covers grammar, a subject typically described as the driest place on earth. In Truss’s (2003: 47) efforts to salvage the apostrophe from the dustbin of history she refers to the late, great Keith Waterhouse’s Association for the Abolition of the Aberrant Apostrophe in the Daily Mirror and Daily Mail, printing ‘hundreds of examples of apostrophe horrors, my all-time favourite being the rather subtle, “Prudential – were here to help you”, which looks a bit unsettling until you realise that what it’s supposed to say is, “Prudential – we’re here to help you”.  I found the chapter on ‘The Tractable Apostrophe’ most useful; it was good to refresh my memory, particularly when advising students on grammar as part of Learning Development. The book is available at 421.1 tru on the first floor of the University Library, with plenty of copies furnishing the shelves.

For more definitive guides on English usage, refer to Fowler’s Modern English book, or the useful A Student’s Grammar of the English Language, both stocked in the Library.

Q. What should Brian have written on the wall, instead of Romanes Eunt Domus?

Desk

Introducing a new 1-to-1 training service we offer…enhance your library skills without having to leave your desk!

  • Save time by improving your searching skills
  • Keep up-to-date with resources specific to your research area
  • Get advice on managing your references
  • Want some library input to your research project/proposal? 

The Deskside training service from the Library is a new service for academic staff and research postgraduates from your Academic Subject Librarian.

Contact us to save time using electronic resources and other services for your research and teaching. I look forward to hearing from you!

The British on Holiday: Charter Tourism, Identity and Consumption (2011) by Hazel Andrews is considered to be a unique ethnographic study of tourists in the Palmanova and Magaluf resorts on the island of Mallorca (incidentally a Catalan spelling of Majorca, it’s more popular name), a predominantly British package holiday destination.

Characterised by fast food outlets with a bawdy reputation as a ‘party’ island and 18-30 club activities, the British have exerted massive cultural influence upon Mallorca typified by pub names like ‘Nutters’ and ‘Diana Beach Bar’. Keenly looking beyond impact of previous studies, Andrews (2011) reflects upon the holiday as a search for a more satisfying life and the aspect of tourist motivation. She discusses the ‘sacred’ ritualisation of the holiday experience as though it is a pilgrimage seeking paradise, even regarding souvenirs as sacred relics. Understanding the regressive childlike behaviour displayed by some tourists, Andrews (2011) explains that their lack of inhibition lends itself towards a Freudian interpretation; a theory which is allegedly supported by travel literature.  Andrews (2011) also explores the notion that someone’s hedonistic fantasy can be another’s Hell, with some sleep deprived tourists wanting to return home early owing to so much noise on the island.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, particularly in trying to understanding the bizarre, and exclusive, concept of Britishness abroad (the supposedly innate need of some tourists to wave the Union Jack on hotel balconies, etc) and Andrews (2011) mega-theory of consumerism and nationalism, deliberately exploited to produce a sense of belonging in British charter tourists. It is amusing (some tourists were not sure if Mallorca was an island!) and thought-provoking because of her interpretation of a wide range theories underpinning tourism studies.

It is available as ebook on the Library Catalogue or as a hard copy in the Library at 910.941 and on the second floor.

Q. Mallorcans have an exceedingly rich history of cuisine; but what is an Arros Brut?

The new season of Learning Development workshops are now available. As before you do not have to book, just come along to the relevant session.

Finding journal articles for your assignment

30 January 11:00-11:50 in UL101
15 February 12:00-17:50 in UL101
2 March 14:00-14:50 in UL101
15 March 12:00-12:50 in UL101

Harvard referencing

24 January 13:00-13:50 in UL102
3 February 12:00-12:50 in UL101
20 February 15:00 -15:50 in UL102
9 March 14:00-14:50 in UL102

 RefWorks: the basics

2 February 12:00-12:50 in UL101
14 February 12:00-12:50 in UL101
23 February 12:00-12:50 in UL101
16 March 12.00-12:50 in UL101
27 March 14:00-14:50 in UL101

 Advanced RefWorks

29 March 17:00-17:50 in UL101 

Introduction to essay writing

26 January 13:00-13:50 in UL102
1 March 12:00-12:50 in UL102
9 March 12:00-12:50 in UL102

Understanding your assignment title

13 February 14:00-14:50 in UL102

Overcoming your fear of presenting

31 January 14:00-14.50 in UL102
7 February 14:00-14.50 in UL102

The Literature Review: What is it? Why do I need one? How do I do it?

6 February 16:00-16.50 in UL102
27 February 16:00-16.50 in UL102
15 March 16:00-16:50 in UL102 

An introduction to NVivo Qualitative Data Analysis Software

17 February 14:00-15:00 in UL101
28 March 10.00-11:00 in UL101

Revision and exam preparation

16 April 14:00-14:50 in UL102
30 April 14:00-14:50 in UL102