Posts tagged Harvard Referencing

When you’re a student information is everywhere. Plagiarism can be problematic when compiling lots of information from several different places, but it is something every student needs to be aware of. Thankfully, this plagiarism tutorial was produced by the Library and explains what plagiarism is and how to carry out good practice. You can test your knowledge at the end.

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20 minutes to learn Refworks? For anyone who has never used Refworks before it can save a lot of time. Two questions you may pondering at the moment: What is it? and Why are you mentioning it today? Refworks is online referencing software that holds all the references you need for any size of assignment from small group project, a 2000 word assignment to PhD thesis. There’s no limit. Secondly, I’m running a Refworks session on Monday and need to prepare (the slides will appear in the next blog post via Scribd, the file sharing platform). If you want to use it, the Refworks software can save you hours of combing returned library boxes, sourcing weblinks, or scraps of paper for lost references.

I’ve just  attended some preliminary training on the referencing software EndNote, which would ideally suit researchers and those committed to longer-term research projects and developing specialisms.  You can use EndNote  to search for keywords, retrieving results and viewing the abstract. The references are then stored under tagging (‘labels’) and establishing themed groups. It is similar to our other referencing software, Refworks  but is probably more aimed at higher level students or researchers.  I was particularly impressed by the way a user could find freely available pdfs within the collated references, rating the article, the flexibility it offered, the use of ‘sticky notes’, and an easy keyword search within the references. You can find EndNote on university pcs (start > all programs > EndNote). There are some videos from endnote.com that will help you if you want to use EndNote.

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Our updated (2nd edition) of the Harvard Referencing guide is now available for download: http://library.lincoln.ac.uk/learning-teaching/referencing/harvard-referencing-guide/ and as an app:

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There are nine minor amendments to the revised edition which are:

  1. Introduction  The first sentence of the second paragraph should read as follows:A bibliography lists all the sources of information that you have consulted, including the items in your reference list.
  2. 3.4 Book without a named author
    Amendment to reference list example:There should not be a full stop after the title of the book
  3. 5 Conference papers
    Amendment to in-text citation example:You should not give the author(s)’ initials
  4. 9.7 Amateur film and 9.8 Trailer
    Amendment to in-text citation:Director’s name should not be in italics
  5. 10.1 Broadcast
    In the diagram:The title or description of the programme should not be in italics
  6. 11.1 Journal articles
    Amendment to reference list example and checklist:Add a comma after the volume number ONLY if there is no part/issue/month/season
  7. 17.2 Facebook
    Amendment to reference list example and checklist:Facebook should be capitalised
  8. 17.4 Twitter
    Amendment to reference list example and checklist:Twitter should be capitalised
  9. 26.1 Personal author
    Amendment to reference list example:There should not be a colon after “Available from”

Do you need any help with your research (finding quality journal articles, searching relevant databases, etc) or Harvard Referencing? Why not come along to our drop-in session based opposite Starbucks on the ground floor of the Business & Law building.  We are happy to see you.

RefWorks Help Guide 2013

This new guide about Refworks covers everything from creating folders and bibliographies to using the companion software, Write & Cite.

Harvard Referencing Guide

We are running workshops for first year Accountancy and Finance students, particularly focusing on Harvard Referencing and finding good quality journal articles.

There’s no need to book – if you are interested in attending, then please just pop along to UL101, the IT lab on the first floor of the Library at the following times:

Monday 23 January        11 – 12

Tuesday 24 January      11 – 12

Wednesday 25 January  11 – 12

Thursday 26 January      11 – 12