Posts tagged http://librarynews.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk

The database for predominantly used to research international news sources, Factiva, has recently improved its log in access.

This means no more “network\” for this database; it also means that the A-to-Z/Find it at Lincoln will link directly to a specific journal title rather than just to the database homepage.

Example: the Lincolnshire Echo – http://lncn.eu/cky6

You can still find the database listed under http://www.library.lincoln.ac.uk > more resources > databases > F > Factiva…

And, if you didn’t already know, Factiva contains a Financial Times archive, alongside the ABI Inform database .

 

 

What’s New in the Library

This is a short PowerPoint presentation about the summer developments in the Library, including the new Learning Development room, a new Library search engine, extra study spaces and speedier PCs, et al.

Hello all and WELCOME to the University of Lincoln.

Just as a gentle reminder here is a run down of Library Inductions for w/c 17th Sept 2012:

Thursday 20th Sept

13.30 – 14.00 Accountancy & Finance BL1101

14.30 – 15.00 Tourism BL1102 (Moot Court)

15.00 – 15.30 Marketing & Advertising BL1101

Friday 21st Sept

09.00 – 09.30 Business BL1101

09.30 – 10.00 Business & Managment BL1101

11.30 – 12.00 LBS Direct Entry Students BL1101

 

We look forward to seeing you all there!

It was very good to meet several German students from the distance learning centre at Hamburg for a library induction yesterday.  They are studying in Lincoln for two weeks only, with another cohort arriving at the end of the month.

As Academic Subject Librarians for the Business School, Martin Osborne (on the left) and myself, Daren Mansfield (the other chap), wish you Viel Glück on your course!

Change can appear dark at times but if we  look at things differently, we may be able to gain light from another perspective. July’s elected Book of the Month, Ring in the Rubble, a management ebook that borders on a self-help guide for business people, starts with a moving account of the author’s son life-threatening birth, and how a golden ring can be found in the midst of when things fall apart; even when you see your life turning to rubble around you.  Gary Bradt’s Ring in the Rubble (2007)  is about discovering opportunities that lie within every situation and overcoming the fear of failure. An intrepid CEO echoes this Tolkien philosophy to her staff:

Folks, government regulations, shifting technologies, industry consolidation, and geopolitical uncertainties have reduced our best-laid business plans to rubble. However, my experience says that buried within the rubble is a golden ring of opportunity. Finding it will catapult us far ahead of our competition. I believe it’s our job as leaders and as an organization to find that ring. So, how do you recommend we proceed? (Bradt, 2007: 5)

A traditional management response might be to benchmark organizations, develop a list of competencies, design a training programme and invite attendees.  Yet the choice is stark.  According to Bradt (2007) to not search for the ring is certain failure in a ‘go for it’ culture , but to aggressively search for the ring is to win. Capitalism turned hunt-game. Not for the faint-hearted or skeptics.

The underlying premise of The Ring in the Rubble applies to your personal life as well, whether you’re ‘facing a new marriage, divorce, birth, death, or illness, it’s not the change itself that dictates the results we get, it’s how we perceive and handle that change that makes all the difference’ (Bradt, 2007: 7). How we face disruption and cope with a mounting workload effectively styles the type of manager you are, and this book challenges the reader to bravely examine established self-perceptions.

The non-solipsistic mantra of chapter 6 appealed to me: ‘Repeat after me: You are not the center of the universe’.  Forfeit the ego….if only! Another illuminating chapter (chap. 8) is ‘What to do when the rubble is deep, your patience is short,  and the odds are long’  starts with the author’s brother Jeff buying a new home and finding a solitary woman in a house full of paint, caulk and junk in every room: 

“Do you mean to tell me that you’re cleaning the whole house by yourself?” he asked her incredulously. “No,” she replied blithely, “I’m only cleaning the room I’m in.” This woman clearly had developed a strategy for dealing with what I call our Everyday Rubble’. (Bradt, 2007: 104). Concentrate upon one job at a time, taking one step at a time.  It might be my ignorance of management theory and Buddhism, but the book may be simply re-packaging mindfulness into the business world, a zen philosophy contemporarily taught by Thich Nhat Hanh. Bradt (2007: 104) explains that to tackle everyday disruption equates with success:

Everyday Rubble accumulates from all of the small yet typical disruptions in our perfectly planned days. Traffic jams, cancelled flights, unexpected meetings, client crises, bulging workloads beyond the norm, unexpected days with no babysitter—all sorts of things can contribute to our pile of Everyday Rubble.

Rethinking failure as something which should not avoided, not to entertain risk avoidance, over-turning the aspiration to acquire top grades, and recognising that the fear of failure holds us back, is a refreshingly bold concept. Is this an anti-scientific method? Children just try things without fear of failure or embarrassment. It’s just learning. Thomas Edison tried thousands of times before he perfected the light bulb.  Bradt (2007: 116) views risk avoidance as nonsensical:

We don’t share ideas in meetings for fear of sounding stupid; we don’t float that new product idea for fear it will be rejected; we won’t even order new items on the menu at lunch for fear of being disappointed! That critical inner voice in our heads holds us back from trying anything new where failure is a possibility.

Being yourself is something which we could all learn from, and not taking yourself too seriously in the process. If you would like to read further, just search the catalogue for Ring in the Rubble and ‘log into ebook here’ near the bottom of the screen.

 

Just a short video wishing all the students from the Business School, and everyone else, good luck and every success in their exams.

Meebo Messenger is a social messaging web-based platform that allows us, the Business Librarians, to answer queries in a more informal way and to extend our interaction with users. If you would like to use this facility then please be assured that correspondence is not seen by anyone else.  To everyone else, the screen will appear clear of any text.

If we are logged onto Meebo it will say ‘Business Librarian is online’.  Alternatively,  if we are out of the office for whatever reason, Meebo will say ‘Business Librarian is offline’.

To find out more about Meebo and how it can be used with other applications like Facebook, please see Pierce Jason Jonota’s two-minute screencast video available on YouTube:

Further to enquiries about getting the RefWorks catalogue search working again, our esteemed colleague Elif Varol has written an excellent step-by-step guide, with screenshots, on using the catalogue search.

 

There’s more information on the Thought Cloud blog: http://elif.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/tag/refworks/

If you would like help with Refworks please email us at businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk and we’ll be happy to help. It’s easier than you may think!

 

 

 

If you would like to learn more about revision techniques in preparation for your forthcoming exams, then you may be interested in attending our workshop taking place on Monday from 2-3 in UL102, on the first floor of the Library. We have uploaded the presentation for this workshop as a taster for the session…

Revision and Exam FINAL V2

As part of the workshop you are encouraged to complete a learning styles questionairre. Everyone has a dominant learning style, to a varying degree, that will help your revision and alleviate some of the stress involved.

3 Study Methods

So, why not discover your learning style and be better prepared for your exams? Just turn up for the workshop – no need to book.

Once known as Marketline, Datamonitor360  is being rebranded once again and will now be known as Marketline Advantage.

We will be updating our database pages to reflect this.

April’s eye-catching contribution to Book of the Month is Pino Bethencourt’s ‘Success in six cups of coffee: How smart networking conquers hidden obstacles’ (2011). I nominated this snappy title because it leaped out from other new book arrivals in the library, not only because of its obvious use to business students, but that networking is a fundamental life skill relevant to all of us. As Bethencourt (2011: 4; 5) advises that ‘networking is perhaps the most critical skill for success in any executive’, suggesting that ‘good networking is useful for almost any goal in life: finding a wife or husband, planning the perfect vacation, selling your house or learning Chinese’. The fabled six degrees of separation is a proven technique to build purposeful relationships; six encounters where bonds are formed. Cultivating a diverse network of contacts ultimately boils down to confidence, as always. If you possess confidence then everything else follows. Taking advantage of every new human interaction might sound opportunistic, even cynical, but realising your networking potential by analysing your relationships and recognising your personal qualities, having a relaxed attitude, avoiding hard-sell, developing high-trust healthy relationships, showing understanding and care, knowing the benefits of socializing, making friends, building influence, knowing your strengths and weaknesses, becoming self-aware, demonstrating patience, and acknowledging the need to change, are valued qualities in any person. It’s also about taking personal responsibility, turning your world around so that you are empowered enough to influence your world rather it influencing you.

Bethencourt (2011: 3) postulates that the need for human connection in business is perhaps more natural than exploitative money-making: ‘Bonding is a millenary ritual of intimate exchange that requires attention to detail and respectful care’. Because it is natural it builds self-confidence too. There a lot of insightful psychology here, as Bethencourt (2011: 36)  identifies a fine line between being authentic and generating interest: ‘The law of reciprocity has been playing a key role in every relationship you’ve established up to now, even if it doesn’t show’. Six cups of coffee goes beyond face-to-face interaction. Bethencourt explores how human trust can develop over keypads and screens via an interview with Erik Wachtmeister, founder of the online communities ‘A Small World’ and ‘Best of all worlds’, the latter specialising in bringing together niche communities, with every chapter ending in a personal interview with an executive.  Bethencourt offers advice on telephone and email manner, valuing the ‘power of now’, personal SWOT analysis, and handling rejection through self-assessment rather than concentrating upon victimisation that only results in avoidance rather than honest action. Part of the success companies within BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China), for instance, lies within the recognition that they could not compete in mature markets (USA, UK, Netherlands, etc) so new markets evolved with double digit growth. Recognising strength and weaknesses is still a vital strategy in any business venture.

An example of understanding networks was illustrated by Greenpeace’s campaign against Japanese whaling.  Not realising that whale meat had saved the Japanese population from starvation after the second world war, they were inadvertently insulting the Japanese. So, they were advised to change their strategy to the more successful ‘now it is time for the Japanese to save the whales in return’ resulting in a globally publicised animation movie  (Bethencourt (2011: 79).

This book is located at 650.13 bet on the 2nd floor of the Library.

Daren Mansfield and Martin Osborne are the Business School librarians, working as a job share, with Daren working the first half of the week and Martin working the second half of the week.

Please email businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk for any of your enquiries and we shall get back to you promptly.

                        

Daren Mansfield                                 Martin Osborne

We can help you find relevant information in your chosen area of study, such as conducting literature reviews. We also provide advice on academic writing, structure, referencing and revision techniques. We are happy to arrange to meet with you on a one-to-one basis.

Additionally, we also hold drop-in sessions on the ground floor of the Business & Law building every Wednesday morning, support the Learning Development room on the ground floor of the Library, and have started to attend lectures across all subject areas.

Spirituality and business is certainly not widely discussed in mainstream academia, which is one of the reasons why I chose this particular title for March’s installment as the Book of the Month. Instrumental and utilitarian rationality rules the business world if you’ve ever wondered! Since the infamous Credit Crunch the ethics of capitalism has been questioned, as  indeed has its sustainability. Just look at the furore between Canada and the EU over the extraction of the toxic tar sands oil. Some might say that the foundations of capitalism have not been fundamentally examined and that trust is broken. Conditions are certainly ripe for revolution: The current state of the Eurozone, quarrels over the Greek bail-out, downgrading of economies, austerity measures, recession, hiking inflation, and increasing unemployment compound any discussion. Overcoming socioeconomic problems is a tall order. Some argue there may be another way of making money, instead of the relentless pursuit of wealth, and Bouckaert and Zsolnai’s The Palgrave Handbook of Spirituality and Business  (2011) suggests such alternatives. 

Workplace spirituality is conscious of avoiding overexploitation of the planet’s resources and stands outside of institutionalized religion. The challenge of sustainability, which includes greening of industry and the ‘self-restricting of needs’, is labelled ‘postcapitalism’ by Bouckaert and Zsolnai (2011: p.6), who explain that ‘business ethics as a system of moral self-regulation fuelling relations of trust and good reputation’ which effectively criticizes the ‘opportunistic tendencies within business’ (Bouckaert and Zsolnai, 2011: 4) . Cultivating distance is a necessary condition for any progressive organisation in the decision-making process, and spirituality may solve the current ‘ethical deficit in business ethics’ because it is ‘an inner experience of deep interconnectedness with all living beings’ which ‘opens a space from the pressures of the market and the routines of business-as-usual’ (Bouckaert and Zsolnai, pp. 4-5).

 There’s lots in this book – some of the most eye-catching essays cover Islamic Economics (Feisal Khan), Quaker Spirituality and the Economy (Laurie Michaelis), Voicing Meaningfulness at Work (Marjolein Lips-Wiersma and Lani Morris), and the thought-provoking chapter Multinational Companies and the Common Good (Francois Lepineux and Jean-Jacques Rose), a concept which even stretches back to Plato’s time.

The book is available at 201.73 pal in the Library if you would like to read more on this fascinating and relatively unexplored topic…

To make it easier to find FAME (Financial Analysis Made Easy) we have added the database to the electronic journals a-z on the Library Catalogue. Search for the financial information of over three million companies in the UK and Ireland by going to the Library Catalogue and selecting Electronic Journals A-Z:

 You will be able to access the database from here: