Posts tagged International Students

Our new database, International Business Online, is a brilliant resource for examining many aspects of business with its collection of videos, located on the Library website under resources > databases. To find such videos you would need to explore Search all Content > Disciplines > Social Sciences > Business & Economics. Then you have the choice to explore several fields of interest:

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There’s also a transcript  I’ve searched and listened to several of these videos and I’m really impressed with the content. One of these I watched was the fascinating Psychology of Prejudice, produced by Robert Broadhurst (New York, NY: Insight Media, 2008), which discusses important research into prejudice, such as stereotypes, integration and several related studies.

Courtesy of the on-screen recording software Camtasia, I’ve recorded a presentation with an embedded video which includes my overdubbed narration. This presentation will be rolled out during the Freshers’ Week in a few days’ time to various subjects I support.

A new reading list using the Talis software has been created by our Library International Co-ordinator, Josh Zhang, listing study books for international students. Just select the title and find the books in our collection. We hope this will prove helpful for students to improve their study skills.

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Josh Zhang has recently started at the Library as the International Coordinator having completed an MSc Computing Science at the University. His first job will be to identify the library needs of international students in order to enhance our services and strengthen our library community. Josh will be visiting seminars to say hello during Semester B.

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Do you need 1-1 help with finding information such as company accounts, accessing scholarly articles or searching  journal databases?

Or would you like help with essay writing, presentation skills, referencing, exam preparation and revision techniques or advice on your dissertation research?

Why not come to our drop-in session held every Wednesday morning  from 9.30-11.30 on the ground floor of the Business & Law building, opposite Starbucks? No need to book an appointment. 

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Martin Osborne & Daren Mansfield

(Academic Subject Librarians for the Business School)

We are pleased to launch the Library Guide for International Students (for business students) which covers matters like finding books and journals and links to the English Language Centre, a library glossary and frequently asked questions. The helpguide section contains interviews with academic staff on their top tips for academic writing is being developed, and further videos will appear over the next few weeks and months as well as being announced on this blog!

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For international students, it’s sometimes hard to understand UK academic culture when beginning their studies.  October’s Book of the Month, Stephen Bailey’s Academic writing for international students of business (2011) proposes a logical framework from which to draw success from academia. Often the simplest methods are the most successful. Indeed, there are formulas available for anyone willing to incorporate them into their personal writing style, such as identifying problems and finding solutions (problem > solution A > arguments against solution A > solutions B and C….).  Acquiring these easy solutions that are liberally peppered throughout the book, would not only help international students, but boost UK students (and staff) writing styles too.

For instance, I found the section on organising paragraphs the most useful, whilst earlier chapters seemed light and too practise-centred, but that, as they say, is all in the design, structurally planned to hook the reader into digesting the entire book.  Organising paragraphs into topic sentence > example 1 > Example 2 > might sound mechanical, too formulaic, un-natural even, but it’s a good beginners technique; building blocks on which to build more sophisticated techniques later on.  Dealing with a single topic, constructing a paragraph of no less than for or five sentences, understanding the visual appeal of a well-determined structure, offering the first sentence as introducing the topic, while adding definitions, examples, information, reasons, restatements and summaries; guiding the reader through clearly presented arguments, are keys to unlock your academic potential.

Planning and precise note-taking is central to organising an effective, clearly presented essay. Having the patience and dedication to craft this technique no doubt becomes easier with practise.  Take the art of summarising a topic by drawing an idea-packed mindmap or spider-gram, cohesively linking key ideas together into a readable structure, makes writing effective. Likewise, organising an argument around defining potential drawbacks > benefits > discussion > economic > ethical > social > discussion is another useful formula. Creating balance of impersonal phrases (‘it is widely accepted that’) versus minority viewpoint (‘some people believe that’), adding counter-arguments and your personal position without sounding too subjective, to add colour and interest weaves depth into an academic critique.

If you would like to read more, and perhaps develop your academic writing, then copies are available at 808.06665 bai on the second floor of the GCW. The Library has a large established, and perhaps under-used, collection of essay writing on the second floor (808 on the second floor). I certainly have benefitted from occasionally using the collection and appreciate it as a rich source of guidance, both for myself (well, you be the judge!) and supporting students in their studies. To develop your creative writing beyond Bailey’s book, then I would recommend Fairfax and Moat’s marvellous The Way to Write (1981), a beginners guide to good writing skills found at 808.066 fai. For an entertaining read,  the great Keith Waterhouse’s Waterhouse on Newspaper Style  is well worth reading for an insight into British journalism. There are plenty of other invaluable books in the academic writing section to expand your writing skills, like Derek Soles ‘The Academic Essay’  available at 808.066 sol.

 

Struggling with your assignments? 

At the English Language Centre  guidance and support on academic essay writing is provided alongside other matters like effective reading and referencing  advice.  If you would like to see either English as a Foreign Language Tutors, Jacqueline Mayer or Alasdair Houser, then they hold drop-in sessions every Tuesday and Friday from 1.00pm – 3.00pm.
 
Please go to: The English Language Centre, Ground Floor, Main Admin Building. 
 
Alternatively you can contact them at: englishlanguage@lincoln.ac.uk or Tel: 01522 886425.