Posts tagged Learning Development @ Lincoln

 

More Books is your chance to tell the Library what resources you need for your academic study.  More Books is an easy and straightforward way for you to influence what we buy.

We sometimes hear that there aren’t enough books in the library, but we need more specific information to act on.  Are there resources that you can’t get hold of because there aren’t enough copies on the shelf or it is missing?  Or is there a book on a module reading list that the library does not have?  Have you found a book you need for your dissertation but the library does not have it? If the answer is yes to any of these please tell us via More Books!

More Books includes a form for you to complete and gives us the details of the book and the reasons why you want us to buy.  From this information we can then purchase either the book or ebook and we will reply to you to tell you what we have done.

More Books is launched today (Monday the 13th January) and will run for a limited period only and so please make your requests as soon as possible.  It is only available to students and so will reflect your academic needs.

Click on the link to fill in the form and submit it: http://library.lincoln.ac.uk/home/customer-information/more-books/

 

For international students, it’s sometimes hard to understand UK academic culture when beginning their studies.  October’s Book of the Month, Stephen Bailey’s Academic writing for international students of business (2011) proposes a logical framework from which to draw success from academia. Often the simplest methods are the most successful. Indeed, there are formulas available for anyone willing to incorporate them into their personal writing style, such as identifying problems and finding solutions (problem > solution A > arguments against solution A > solutions B and C….).  Acquiring these easy solutions that are liberally peppered throughout the book, would not only help international students, but boost UK students (and staff) writing styles too.

For instance, I found the section on organising paragraphs the most useful, whilst earlier chapters seemed light and too practise-centred, but that, as they say, is all in the design, structurally planned to hook the reader into digesting the entire book.  Organising paragraphs into topic sentence > example 1 > Example 2 > might sound mechanical, too formulaic, un-natural even, but it’s a good beginners technique; building blocks on which to build more sophisticated techniques later on.  Dealing with a single topic, constructing a paragraph of no less than for or five sentences, understanding the visual appeal of a well-determined structure, offering the first sentence as introducing the topic, while adding definitions, examples, information, reasons, restatements and summaries; guiding the reader through clearly presented arguments, are keys to unlock your academic potential.

Planning and precise note-taking is central to organising an effective, clearly presented essay. Having the patience and dedication to craft this technique no doubt becomes easier with practise.  Take the art of summarising a topic by drawing an idea-packed mindmap or spider-gram, cohesively linking key ideas together into a readable structure, makes writing effective. Likewise, organising an argument around defining potential drawbacks > benefits > discussion > economic > ethical > social > discussion is another useful formula. Creating balance of impersonal phrases (‘it is widely accepted that’) versus minority viewpoint (‘some people believe that’), adding counter-arguments and your personal position without sounding too subjective, to add colour and interest weaves depth into an academic critique.

If you would like to read more, and perhaps develop your academic writing, then copies are available at 808.06665 bai on the second floor of the GCW. The Library has a large established, and perhaps under-used, collection of essay writing on the second floor (808 on the second floor). I certainly have benefitted from occasionally using the collection and appreciate it as a rich source of guidance, both for myself (well, you be the judge!) and supporting students in their studies. To develop your creative writing beyond Bailey’s book, then I would recommend Fairfax and Moat’s marvellous The Way to Write (1981), a beginners guide to good writing skills found at 808.066 fai. For an entertaining read,  the great Keith Waterhouse’s Waterhouse on Newspaper Style  is well worth reading for an insight into British journalism. There are plenty of other invaluable books in the academic writing section to expand your writing skills, like Derek Soles ‘The Academic Essay’  available at 808.066 sol.

 

What’s New in the Library

This is a short PowerPoint presentation about the summer developments in the Library, including the new Learning Development room, a new Library search engine, extra study spaces and speedier PCs, et al.

This short introductory video of Martin Osborne and Daren Mansfield, Academic Subject Librarians for the Business School, took an incredible 18 takes to complete – which is the reason why we’re celebrating at the end! You may have to raise the volume on your computer…

Change can appear dark at times but if we  look at things differently, we may be able to gain light from another perspective. July’s elected Book of the Month, Ring in the Rubble, a management ebook that borders on a self-help guide for business people, starts with a moving account of the author’s son life-threatening birth, and how a golden ring can be found in the midst of when things fall apart; even when you see your life turning to rubble around you.  Gary Bradt’s Ring in the Rubble (2007)  is about discovering opportunities that lie within every situation and overcoming the fear of failure. An intrepid CEO echoes this Tolkien philosophy to her staff:

Folks, government regulations, shifting technologies, industry consolidation, and geopolitical uncertainties have reduced our best-laid business plans to rubble. However, my experience says that buried within the rubble is a golden ring of opportunity. Finding it will catapult us far ahead of our competition. I believe it’s our job as leaders and as an organization to find that ring. So, how do you recommend we proceed? (Bradt, 2007: 5)

A traditional management response might be to benchmark organizations, develop a list of competencies, design a training programme and invite attendees.  Yet the choice is stark.  According to Bradt (2007) to not search for the ring is certain failure in a ‘go for it’ culture , but to aggressively search for the ring is to win. Capitalism turned hunt-game. Not for the faint-hearted or skeptics.

The underlying premise of The Ring in the Rubble applies to your personal life as well, whether you’re ‘facing a new marriage, divorce, birth, death, or illness, it’s not the change itself that dictates the results we get, it’s how we perceive and handle that change that makes all the difference’ (Bradt, 2007: 7). How we face disruption and cope with a mounting workload effectively styles the type of manager you are, and this book challenges the reader to bravely examine established self-perceptions.

The non-solipsistic mantra of chapter 6 appealed to me: ‘Repeat after me: You are not the center of the universe’.  Forfeit the ego….if only! Another illuminating chapter (chap. 8) is ‘What to do when the rubble is deep, your patience is short,  and the odds are long’  starts with the author’s brother Jeff buying a new home and finding a solitary woman in a house full of paint, caulk and junk in every room: 

“Do you mean to tell me that you’re cleaning the whole house by yourself?” he asked her incredulously. “No,” she replied blithely, “I’m only cleaning the room I’m in.” This woman clearly had developed a strategy for dealing with what I call our Everyday Rubble’. (Bradt, 2007: 104). Concentrate upon one job at a time, taking one step at a time.  It might be my ignorance of management theory and Buddhism, but the book may be simply re-packaging mindfulness into the business world, a zen philosophy contemporarily taught by Thich Nhat Hanh. Bradt (2007: 104) explains that to tackle everyday disruption equates with success:

Everyday Rubble accumulates from all of the small yet typical disruptions in our perfectly planned days. Traffic jams, cancelled flights, unexpected meetings, client crises, bulging workloads beyond the norm, unexpected days with no babysitter—all sorts of things can contribute to our pile of Everyday Rubble.

Rethinking failure as something which should not avoided, not to entertain risk avoidance, over-turning the aspiration to acquire top grades, and recognising that the fear of failure holds us back, is a refreshingly bold concept. Is this an anti-scientific method? Children just try things without fear of failure or embarrassment. It’s just learning. Thomas Edison tried thousands of times before he perfected the light bulb.  Bradt (2007: 116) views risk avoidance as nonsensical:

We don’t share ideas in meetings for fear of sounding stupid; we don’t float that new product idea for fear it will be rejected; we won’t even order new items on the menu at lunch for fear of being disappointed! That critical inner voice in our heads holds us back from trying anything new where failure is a possibility.

Being yourself is something which we could all learn from, and not taking yourself too seriously in the process. If you would like to read further, just search the catalogue for Ring in the Rubble and ‘log into ebook here’ near the bottom of the screen.

 

Just a short video wishing all the students from the Business School, and everyone else, good luck and every success in their exams.

neighborhood

If you are ever struggling to find local statistical information then try using the Neighbourhood Statistics website .

Produced by the office of National Statistics, this useful site allows you to narrow down your search by postcode or town to find relevant data for your area of study.

Another useful source of local statistical information is the Lincolnshire Research Observatory site.

Established in December 1999, the Lincolnshire Research Observatory (LRO) is a partnership of organisations across the county who aim to share and improve access to quality information and intelligence about Lincolnshire. You can also register to access regular up-dates whenever new sources of information are available.

If you need any help accessing either web site then email Daren or Martin at businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk

 

 

 

Once known as Marketline, Datamonitor360  is being rebranded once again and will now be known as Marketline Advantage.

We will be updating our database pages to reflect this.

Daren Mansfield and Martin Osborne are the Business School librarians, working as a job share, with Daren working the first half of the week and Martin working the second half of the week.

Please email businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk for any of your enquiries and we shall get back to you promptly.

                        

Daren Mansfield                                 Martin Osborne

We can help you find relevant information in your chosen area of study, such as conducting literature reviews. We also provide advice on academic writing, structure, referencing and revision techniques. We are happy to arrange to meet with you on a one-to-one basis.

Additionally, we also hold drop-in sessions on the ground floor of the Business & Law building every Wednesday morning, support the Learning Development room on the ground floor of the Library, and have started to attend lectures across all subject areas.

The Creative Review Handbook has ceased publication. However there is a web site available at: www.chb.com

It seems to be free to view and is continuing for the foreseeable future.

This is advance notice that effective 30 June 2012, The Economist will no longer be available in academic library subscriptions to Factiva.

However, you will still be able to access The Economist via our subscription to ABI/Inform without embargo.

If you would like any help accessing any of the databases available to you please email Daren Mansfield or Martin Osborne at businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk

 

Having trouble accessing the Portal off campus? This short video takes you through the various steps to gain access to the Portal’s electronic resources…

Have you ever wondered what your preferred learning style is? Help your revision techniques by downloading and completing this questionnaire, then read about your dominant learning style below. Techniques drawn from your learning style will enable you to revise more efficiently and tackle your exams with greater confidence.

3 Study Methods

Some of you, like me, have been experiencing problems accessing Science Direct. A message saying ‘Sorry, your request can’t be processed due to a system problem’ appears when you try to log on.  However, if you select the ‘Search’ tab at the top of the screen then you should be able to use the database without hindrance. The problem has been reported and we hope that it is resolved shortly.

Struggling with grammar? Do you know the difference between present and third person indicative’?

Anyone who has watched Monty Python’s The Life of Brian (1979) may know the reference. The brilliant sketch (Romanes Eunt Domus) between a pedantic Roman soldier (John Cleese) and the luckless Brian (Graham Chapman), when Brian is reprimanded after daubing Latin graffiti on a Jerusalem wall, acknowledges the baffling and occasionally obsessive idiosyncracies of proper grammar. Fortunately the surprise bestseller Eats, Shoots & Leaves (2003) by Lynne Truss humorously covers grammar, a subject typically described as the driest place on earth. In Truss’s (2003: 47) efforts to salvage the apostrophe from the dustbin of history she refers to the late, great Keith Waterhouse’s Association for the Abolition of the Aberrant Apostrophe in the Daily Mirror and Daily Mail, printing ‘hundreds of examples of apostrophe horrors, my all-time favourite being the rather subtle, “Prudential – were here to help you”, which looks a bit unsettling until you realise that what it’s supposed to say is, “Prudential – we’re here to help you”.  I found the chapter on ‘The Tractable Apostrophe’ most useful; it was good to refresh my memory, particularly when advising students on grammar as part of Learning Development. The book is available at 421.1 tru on the first floor of the University Library, with plenty of copies furnishing the shelves.

For more definitive guides on English usage, refer to Fowler’s Modern English book, or the useful A Student’s Grammar of the English Language, both stocked in the Library.

Q. What should Brian have written on the wall, instead of Romanes Eunt Domus?