Posts tagged library catalogue

If you go to the Library website and then to the Help tab you can easily reset your pin number. Once you’ve done this you’ll receive a confirmation email (check your student email address):

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This answer was also entered onto the Just Ask forum available on the Library website.

The comprehensive Library International study books reading list was compiled by Josh Zhang, our former Library International Student Coordinator. Its four sections consist of  English Language support (6 items), Academic Writing (23 items), Study Skills (9 items), and Learning a different language (12 items). As it’s a Talis reading list, all items link to the library catalogue.  We hope that it will prove a useful tool in supporting international students in their study at Lincoln. 

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http://lists.library.lincoln.ac.uk/lists/C6EDACA7-DAB0-7AD6-2D79-66406E0768E5.html

 

 

We will be launching a new library management system to be hosted by Capita in order to improve the student experience. We will be moving our library services to a cloud enabling students to locate resources in different systems from a single search box (see screenshots below). A web-based interface from Capita, known as Soprano, will support staff in the library and may be used for stock management, reservations and general library tasks, such as quickly responding to student enquiries. University librarian Ian Snowley noted that the user satisfaction is critical if the university wants to attract students: “Capita’s LMS will enable the library to deliver a great experience for our students by making it easier for them to search for and find the resources they need” ….“it will also equip staff with the tools to deliver excellent customer service.”

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Search results can appear colourful, clear and much like the functionality employed by a famous American electronic commerce and cloud computing company with headquarters in Seattle, Washington.

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The following links are examples of other university libraries using Capita (Prism):

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/ncirl/

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/edgehill/

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/gsa/

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/roehampton/

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/dmu/

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/rcs/

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/yorksj/

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/birmingham

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/mmu

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/uclan

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/dcu

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/bournemouth.ac/

https://capitadiscovery.co.uk/brookes

https://capitadiscovery.co.uk/fife

https://capitadiscovery.co.uk/gloslibraries

https://capitadiscovery.co.uk/swindon

 

 

 

 

CapturestepsIn this blog post I want to outline the process of conducting a literature review on a chosen topic, such as ‘buyer behaviour and ethical purchase intentions’. My main advice whilst carrying out this type of research is to be open-minded and explore ideas as though it’s the first time you have come across this topic.

 

 

 

 

 

Literature searching and the art of reviewing literature 

  1. Allow yourself time to browse the library catalogue (library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > Library catalogue…) http://catalogue.library.lincoln.ac.uk/ipac20/ipac.jsp?profile=
  2. Search for relevant material on your chosen topic.
  3. Search for ‘BA marketing’ for instance as this will bring up undergraduate dissertations. (282 titles matched)
  4. Search Find it at Lincoln on the Library webpage (on Find it at Lincoln you can ‘add to folder’ which makes it easier to collate your research, and send it via email then save on your student drive, memory stick, et al).
  5. Search the Advertising and Marketing Library subject guide: http://guides.library.lincoln.ac.uk/advertisingandmarketing for relevant databases like Warc.com and ABI Inform using keywords like ‘buyer behaviour and ethical purchase intentions’ (ABI Inform has some 7, 154 results).
  6. Identify key articles, conference papers, quality newspapers (check out the Lexis Library database), and interesting chapters relevant to your topic.
  7. I might amend my searches by adding ‘motivation’ or ‘actual’ to refine my research .
  8. Explore some ideas and focus your reading, BEFORE writing any draft (but be adaptable, open to change as your literature review may veer from its original course).
  9. Critically evaluate what you read; don’t take things at face value, look deeper. It is healthy to question everything but remember to be objective to form a balanced opinion.
  10. Look for ‘chains’ (they will make the structure easier) when you design the essay plan. How does one piece of research or set of ideas influence the next? Use a mind map or flow chart if necessary.
  11. Write brief notes about the development of the research over time
  12. Note the key 5-10 pieces of research that most influenced the subject. Briefly chart how each piece of research influenced others in the chain.
  13. Identify how your research will follow on from previous research. Will it add to knowledge about the topic or methods? Add this to your introduction.

(indebted to Stella Cottrell’s ever popular Study Skills Handbook, 2008). Making study easier. Incidentally, Stella’s now PVC for Learning, Teaching and Student Engagement at the University of East London.

For a more detailed overview of a literature review I found it a pleasure to read the University of Leicester’s Student Learning Development webpage on Doing a Literature Review. http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ld/resources/writing/writing-resources/literature-review which contains invaluable advice on structure, editing, remaining focused, amongst other gems. Reviewing literature can be overwhelming and it is a skill in knowing where the boundaries lay (i.e. what to leave in, what to leave out) and is a cause of many a student headache so it’s worth to remember the valuable advice from Rudestam and Newton (1992:49) when they said to ‘build an argument, not a library’.

References

Cottell, S. (2008). Study Skills Handbook. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Rudestam K. & Newton R. (1992). Surviving your dissertation. London:Sage.

 

 

 

It’s at this time of year when students start browsing the dissertation collection to find out more about structure, particular topics, useful bibliographies and general layout; how contents pages and appendices are managed are also typical enquiries.  Half way down the ground floor of the Library is our dissertation collection, just past the binding area, with undergraduate  dissertations located on the right-hand side of the entrance and postgraduate dissertations on the left.  So, if you’re looking for a particular subject just type ‘BA management‘ or another award into the search box of the Library catalogue; a list of  University of Lincoln dissertations will then appear in date order. The dissertations are arranged by subject and then by surname on the shelves.

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Promoting dissertations gives me another chance to eulogise the merits of another great source of information, the database called  EThOS  which contains over 400,000 doctoral theses. You can download instantly for your research, or order a scanned copy quickly and easily. I’ve found EThOS extraordinarily helpful at supporting students at all levels of study. It saves time in the long run to use these resources, plus you don’t have to read the whole document.

Find it at Lincoln guide

This helpguide is to show you how to use the new search engine, Find it at Lincoln, more effectively. I have also uploaded a link to the Business School libguide under the Help Guides tab.

http://guides.library.lincoln.ac.uk/business

 

Further to enquiries about getting the RefWorks catalogue search working again, our esteemed colleague Elif Varol has written an excellent step-by-step guide, with screenshots, on using the catalogue search.

 

There’s more information on the Thought Cloud blog: http://elif.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/tag/refworks/

If you would like help with Refworks please email us at businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk and we’ll be happy to help. It’s easier than you may think!

 

 

 

To make it easier to find FAME (Financial Analysis Made Easy) we have added the database to the electronic journals a-z on the Library Catalogue. Search for the financial information of over three million companies in the UK and Ireland by going to the Library Catalogue and selecting Electronic Journals A-Z:

 You will be able to access the database from here: