Posts tagged marketing

My favourite book from the latest arrivals for the Lincoln International Business has got to be Stephen Wearing, Stephen Schweinsberg and John Tower’s (2016) Marketing national parks for sustainable tourism – what yours? This gem is located at Main 363.68068 WEA on the 1st floor of the Library.

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Worthwhile books are always a feature on the cumulative list of Book of the Month entries. Mark W. Schaeffer’s (2014: 22-23) landmark new edition of the Tao of Twitter (located at 658. 872 sch) contains the illuminating mantra: “Human interaction leads to connections. Connections lead to awareness. Awareness leads to trust. Trust is the ultimate catalyst to business benefits, as it always has been.” It’s a simple step to knowing how that relates to building a cost effective, sustainable business. What exactly are the benefits to business? According to Schaeffer (2014: 27) they are:

  •      Competitive intelligence
  •      Market insight
  •      A new supplier or partner
  •      Publicity
  •      Brand awareness
  •      An idea
  •      New products and services
  •      Potential new customers

Such points can be supported by studies too. Twitter’s dynamic arena can lead to job advice, job offers, invitations, international blogging connections, global brand awareness, and supportive relationships. Twitter is a more effective promotional tool than Facebook. Every study shows that the Twitter community is the most loyal and engaged, according to the “Social Research” study by Edison Research (2014).  One study (not referenced in the book) shows that 67% of Twitter followers (versus 51% of Facebook fans) are more likely to buy the brands they follow (Schaeffer, 2014: 31). The Marketing firm SocialTwist analysed a million Facebook and Twitter followers, and Twitter’s tweets amassed over three times as many clicks on average than Facebook (Schaeffer, 2014). One last statistic. Daily Twitter users are “six times more likely to publish articles, five times more likely to post blogs, seven times more likely to post to wikis, and three times as more likely to post product reviews at least monthly compared with non-Twitter users” (Schaeffer, 2014: 36). One last thing: targeted connections. Writing a review on what must be considered as an indispensable guide for anyone using Twitter (from a business angle) it is tempting to reproduce the entire book in one blog post. So, I simply recommend that you read it instead.

Now the summer has arrived (or almost) it’s time for a refresh of the Business & Law Librarian blog. I hope you like it. I’ve gone with the blend of a metropolitan skyline at night (Brisbane, if you’re wondering) and of course, a library-themed background. Studying for the future leitmotif. I like it as it looks fresh and colourful (well, I would say that as I designed it!)

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CapturestepsIn this blog post I want to outline the process of conducting a literature review on a chosen topic, such as ‘buyer behaviour and ethical purchase intentions’. My main advice whilst carrying out this type of research is to be open-minded and explore ideas as though it’s the first time you have come across this topic.

 

 

 

 

 

Literature searching and the art of reviewing literature 

  1. Allow yourself time to browse the library catalogue (library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > Library catalogue…) http://catalogue.library.lincoln.ac.uk/ipac20/ipac.jsp?profile=
  2. Search for relevant material on your chosen topic.
  3. Search for ‘BA marketing’ for instance as this will bring up undergraduate dissertations. (282 titles matched)
  4. Search Find it at Lincoln on the Library webpage (on Find it at Lincoln you can ‘add to folder’ which makes it easier to collate your research, and send it via email then save on your student drive, memory stick, et al).
  5. Search the Advertising and Marketing Library subject guide: http://guides.library.lincoln.ac.uk/advertisingandmarketing for relevant databases like Warc.com and ABI Inform using keywords like ‘buyer behaviour and ethical purchase intentions’ (ABI Inform has some 7, 154 results).
  6. Identify key articles, conference papers, quality newspapers (check out the Lexis Library database), and interesting chapters relevant to your topic.
  7. I might amend my searches by adding ‘motivation’ or ‘actual’ to refine my research .
  8. Explore some ideas and focus your reading, BEFORE writing any draft (but be adaptable, open to change as your literature review may veer from its original course).
  9. Critically evaluate what you read; don’t take things at face value, look deeper. It is healthy to question everything but remember to be objective to form a balanced opinion.
  10. Look for ‘chains’ (they will make the structure easier) when you design the essay plan. How does one piece of research or set of ideas influence the next? Use a mind map or flow chart if necessary.
  11. Write brief notes about the development of the research over time
  12. Note the key 5-10 pieces of research that most influenced the subject. Briefly chart how each piece of research influenced others in the chain.
  13. Identify how your research will follow on from previous research. Will it add to knowledge about the topic or methods? Add this to your introduction.

(indebted to Stella Cottrell’s ever popular Study Skills Handbook, 2008). Making study easier. Incidentally, Stella’s now PVC for Learning, Teaching and Student Engagement at the University of East London.

For a more detailed overview of a literature review I found it a pleasure to read the University of Leicester’s Student Learning Development webpage on Doing a Literature Review. http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ld/resources/writing/writing-resources/literature-review which contains invaluable advice on structure, editing, remaining focused, amongst other gems. Reviewing literature can be overwhelming and it is a skill in knowing where the boundaries lay (i.e. what to leave in, what to leave out) and is a cause of many a student headache so it’s worth to remember the valuable advice from Rudestam and Newton (1992:49) when they said to ‘build an argument, not a library’.

References

Cottell, S. (2008). Study Skills Handbook. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Rudestam K. & Newton R. (1992). Surviving your dissertation. London:Sage.

 

 

 

  • New entry gates which will make access a lot easier;
  • New improved thin client PCs with updated software and much better processing power so they can handle video at full screen;
  • Twelve replacement Macs;
  • Increased budget – additional £30k for Reading List books;
  • More 24/7 opening – starting 5th October;
  • A better organised and more up-to-date stock (thanks to extensive weeding and stock moves);
  • Permanent display case on the Ground Floor – coming soon ‘Steampunks’;
  • Online 3D Maps – currently under development;
  • Better water fountain on the Ground Floor (+ possibility of water on upper floors too);
  • Office 2016  (the mac version of 365) has already been rolled out to the Macs on the 1st floor;
  • More ‘user friendly’ Eating and Drinking policy.

Courtesy of the on-screen recording software Camtasia, I’ve recorded a presentation with an embedded video which includes my overdubbed narration. This presentation will be rolled out during the Freshers’ Week in a few days’ time to various subjects I support.

The Euromonitor International blog is a veritable feast of contributions, videos and presentations that I find is worthwhile to examine on a regular basis for anyone interested in marketing, investment and strategic management. Today I was interested in luxury goods and was interested to find that an expert analyst, Rob Walker, had written a blog post on luxury spirits. You can find other categories on the right hand side of the blog and identify related posts.  Correct me if I’m wrong, but no other database offers this kind of informative blog that is updated so regularly. It also gives me loads of information to blog about!

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The time has finally come to create a work-related Twitter account to relentlessly publicise the Business Librarian blog and its content.  180+ posts and counting since its inception in 2011. As you know, I blog regularly throughout the working week and would like to (shamelessly some might say) generate more hits. Join me in my quest to promote the University Library to Business School students @LINCLibrarian.

In addition the great joy about setting up a work account is that I am able to link to subject-related journals, magazines, newspapers and organisations that I’ve been familiar with for several years in my role as subject librarian for Accountancy and Finance, Advertising and Marketing, Economics, Events Management, International Business, Modern Languages and Tourism.

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Often students struggle on how to start an assignment which asks them about entering a new market with a product of their choice. Which product and what country to invest in? How can they see what the market volume is and whether it is worth entering a country where the market has a healthy forecast? Help is at hand. Fortunately, Euromonitor has the answer to these questions and much more, particularly as I have been exploring the wizardry Dashboard feature (below) on the database which provides the researcher with useful market size and insightful forecast, meaning they can learn if a market has potential or has reached saturation point. The following six-step instructions is a method to easily answer an international business assignment within a few well-spent minutes.

Purely hypothetically if I am interested in selling smartphones in Vietnam via shopping outlets does this idea have any business potential. Simply, is it worth investing in?

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1. Firstly, go to library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > E > Euromonitor.

2. On the homepage go to Choose Industry > Consumer Electronics > Dashboard > GO.

3. Table 1 below shows the market size of consumer electronics (dark blue showing the greatest)

Table 1: Consumer Electronics Dashboard (Market Size)

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4. This map can be changed to forecast (on the top left-hand side) to show forecast, to find out whether a growth area like India or far-eastern Asia is worth investing in, and immediately we can see the darker blue areas are worth investigating further.

Table 2: Consumer Electronics (Forecast Growth)

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5. If we select Channel View from the tabs we can appreciate that some of far-eastern Asia sells a double-figure growth in consumer electronics using store-based retailing.

Table 3: Store-Based Retailing (Historic Growth)

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6. Choose category > Portable Consumer Appliances > Mobile Phones. We can see that from Table 4 the paler blue areas might be worth investigating, like Vietnam. We can hover our mouse over an area and break the data into smaller chunks.

Table 4: Mobile Phones (market size)

 

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Table 5: Mobile Phones (forecast growth)

 

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From Table 5 we can see that consumer electronics are a boom area in Vietnam and selling mobile phones via store-based retailing is worth investing in. Indeed, by hovering the mouse over the country we can see that mobile phones sales are predicted to grow an amazing 13.7%. From these simple steps we can see that it is possible not only to find an idea for an assignment using Euromonitor but we are able to plan the structure too. We can also drill down further into whether we are selling Smartphones, or another mobile phone product. Market wizardry in a snapshot!

 

Philip Kotler gives the lowdown on Marketing, via the YouTube channel. Simply unmissable for anyone interested in business. Kotler’s book, Marketing Management, is the world’s most widely used graduate level textbook in marketing. The sixteenth edition of Phlip Kotler and Gary Armstrong’s extraordinarily popular Principle of Marketing is held at the University Library, like so many libraries all over world. In this lecture the man himself effortlessly talks about marketing at the Chicago Humanities Festival in 2012, a prestigious gathering which attracts today’s brilliant minds. The word ‘marketing’ was not even invented in the year 1900. The first department store was opened in Japan. The first newspaper ad appeared during the English interregnum period in 1652 advertising coffee, and the first ad agency NW Ayres appeared advertising Pears Soap in the Victorian era. The ancient Greeks had markets. The first marketing books appeared as economist books, but were written by ‘disillusioned economists’, so marketing is a branch of economics by association.  Kotler’s famous mantra is place, price and promotion, potential, but what is marketing? ‘Marketing is everything’ and starts with the customer. Without the customer there is no business.  Marketers rarely talk about ‘sane marketing’ like a brewery advising about not drinking too much, or the ethical use of pesticides. The public doesn’t tend to buy something that is a new idea. Even activist Noami Klein’s seminal No Logo is considered a marketing book even though it attacks brand consumption, because she informs the public that they are ‘paying too much’ for a product because of its received brand kudos.  Kotler lists the best marketers like Ingvar Kamprad, the founder of IKEA, who wanted to reduce the price of furniture.  The late Anita Roddick of Body Shop said, somewhat elliptically, ‘not selling hope – I’m selling motion’. Richard Branson’s a great self-publicist using stunts to promote a new product. Kotler discusses the products of aspiration, selling compassion, improving the lives of people.  He asks the audience if there is a company they like, and Apple is unsurprisingly the favourite, like so many of our students choosing to write marketing assignments on product placement of the Apple i-phone in an emerging economy .  It emerges that the customer is the bona fide marketer of Coca-Cola, because the company created a love-affair with the consumer so it pays relatively little for marketing.  It’s all about exposure, particularly around social media, but the firm needs to know its audience otherwise investment is a waste of money. But has the U.S. reached saturation point? Growth is the issue. Growth means jobs. Kotler discusses the death of demand, how does a firm grow and defend that business and hold onto their customers? His advice is astonishing: ignore the books!  Go against the grain to succeed. I would recommend this video for anyone wishing to learn more about marketing from a certified expert.

YouTube, as you know as you’re reading this blog entry, is a treasure trove of lectures by notable figures from business schools across the globe. It is worth exploring and finding out about your subject in an age of democratising information.

At the University of Lincoln we have many relevant programmes where the database Euromonitor International is such a key resource such as Business and Marketing, International Business, International Tourism Business, Human Resources, Logistics, MBA and Social Research. In addition to these courses other departments such as Lincoln School of Film & Media, National Centre for Food Manufacturing (NCFM), Sport and Exercise Science are seeing the benefit of using this resource.

Euromonitor has access to 80 countries for both Industries and Countries and Consumers, and cross-comparable statistics as well as different types of analysis so why not take a look at the video outlining some of these features.

Euromonitor can be found via library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > databases > E > Euromonitor.

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Although this message was originally posted in March this year, I thought it was important to re-announce that from 1st June 2015 subject support for the Business School will be split along the following lines:

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Daren will support…Accountancy and Finance, Advertising and Marketing, Economics, Events Management, International Business, Languages, Tourism, Lincoln College.

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Martin will support…Business, Business & Management, Management, MBA, Professional Development, North Lindsey College .

Our (amicable) separation is not divorce though, as both Daren and Martin will continue to work closely together as we remain part-time and unable to cover the week individually. A range of libguides will shortly be published to support these various subjects.