Posts tagged referencing

We understand that when you begin your studies at the university, referencing can be a labyrinth of confusion. Fortunately the Library has produced a tutorial which compliments the Harvard Referencing guide  (available in print and online).

CaptureHARV!

 

 

 

 

20 minutes to learn Refworks? For anyone who has never used Refworks before it can save a lot of time. Two questions you may pondering at the moment: What is it? and Why are you mentioning it today? Refworks is online referencing software that holds all the references you need for any size of assignment from small group project, a 2000 word assignment to PhD thesis. There’s no limit. Secondly, I’m running a Refworks session on Monday and need to prepare (the slides will appear in the next blog post via Scribd, the file sharing platform). If you want to use it, the Refworks software can save you hours of combing returned library boxes, sourcing weblinks, or scraps of paper for lost references.

Have you ever wondered how to make referencing a a whole lot easier? Refworks is an online bibliographic tool that organises and then formats your references and all it takes is a few moments to set up an account – see below for a quick tutorial. Plus the University of Lincoln’s version of Refworks has a full range of referencing styles which also incorporates our very own Harvard Referencing guide:

I’ve just  attended some preliminary training on the referencing software EndNote, which would ideally suit researchers and those committed to longer-term research projects and developing specialisms.  You can use EndNote  to search for keywords, retrieving results and viewing the abstract. The references are then stored under tagging (‘labels’) and establishing themed groups. It is similar to our other referencing software, Refworks  but is probably more aimed at higher level students or researchers.  I was particularly impressed by the way a user could find freely available pdfs within the collated references, rating the article, the flexibility it offered, the use of ‘sticky notes’, and an easy keyword search within the references. You can find EndNote on university pcs (start > all programs > EndNote). There are some videos from endnote.com that will help you if you want to use EndNote.

For Windows:

For Macs: