Posts tagged study skills

We are delighted to announce a new accessible-friendly eBook platform, Bibliotech, which is available via the Library website > Find > Databases > B > Bibliotech.  At the moment it includes several study skills eBooks which you are welcome to download, and in the near future we hope to expand this collection to cover high-demand books, some of which have not been available as electronic versions before. This is a major step forward in being able to deliver our most popular  print titles in an electronic format, and eliminating the stress of waiting in a queue for a highly-prized core text book that it is always on loan.

 

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Are you a Lincoln International Business School student and want to discuss your research with your subject librarian in the Library? Fortunately, we have set up loads of 30 minute appointments to maximise the number of students we can see  – just select ‘make an appointment’. I’m sorry for any delay in setting my calendar up, but it’s been a hectic semester with forty
hours of teaching already delivered!

There’s loads of mini workshops taking place in the Library this week, please take  a look at our Upcoming Events section on the Library Website. No need to book, just arrive promptly as these sessions will only last a maximum of 15 minutes.

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This presentation was delivered to all 1st year Lincoln International Business School students in the Isaac Newton main lecture theatre as part of an academic skills presentation (this time without a radio mic!).

Library Searches Sept 17 by Daren Mansfield on Scribd

Are you struggling with your assignment? Why not visit our Academic Writing Support drop-ins from Monday to Thursday:

Monday 11.00 – 13.00
Tuesday 12.00 – 13.00
Wednesday 9.00 – 10.00
Thursday 14.00 – 16.00

If you bring along your assignment draft, we can give you advice on matters like whether you have:

  • managed to answer the question
  • the structure flows well
  • applied critical discussion throughout

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This is the team: Cheryl, Daren, Judith. The drop-in sessions take place in the Learning Development room on the ground floor of the Library.

 

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We often get asked about the modern day paradox of being able to retrieve thousands of articles from the fabulous Library website, but not having the time to read more than a handful. Are there any tips we would recommend to, erm, speed up the process…Happily, Sutz & Weverka (2009, 10) have produced their ‘Speed reading for dummies‘ book (also available an ebook), which contains some valuable information such as noting what ‘eye fixations’ are (‘when your eyes stop moving at different points in a sentence as you read it’). Invaluably, the important points to know about speed reading are:

✓ You read several words in a single glance. Unless you’re encountering words you don’t know or haven’t read before, you don’t read words one at a time.

✓ You expand your vision so that you can read and understand many words in a single glance. A very good speed reader can read, see, and process 10 to 14 words in a single eye fixation.

✓ You expand your vision to read vertically as well as horizon- tally on the page. As well as taking in more than one word on a line of text, speed readers can also, in a single glance, read and understand words on two or three different lines. Check out Chapter 6 for more on expanding your reading vision, and head to Chapter 15 for some exercises that help you do just that.

(Sutz & Weverka: 2009, 10)

Speed reading is about expanding your vocabulary, which makes comprehension easier, being familiar with the subject matter, focused concentration and making those strategic selections in choosing the text you want to digest. Sitting position is also important. Because it’s an emphatically practical book, there are helpful exercises at the end of each chapter.

The print book is available in the library at 428.432 sut on the 1st floor.

 

The comprehensive Library International study books reading list was compiled by Josh Zhang, our former Library International Student Coordinator. Its four sections consist of  English Language support (6 items), Academic Writing (23 items), Study Skills (9 items), and Learning a different language (12 items). As it’s a Talis reading list, all items link to the library catalogue.  We hope that it will prove a useful tool in supporting international students in their study at Lincoln. 

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http://lists.library.lincoln.ac.uk/lists/C6EDACA7-DAB0-7AD6-2D79-66406E0768E5.html

 

 

Love them or loathe them but reflective accounts are here to stay in Higher Education, be it recorded on a reflective journal entry, a text on your mobile, an essay a Twitter, blog or Facebook entry, a formal report or professional account . Some naturally feel uncomfortable with this kind of writing. Fortunately for the purposes of this blog post, I enjoy tracking my learning through writing, which I have accomplished a few times at postgraduate study, as well as supporting students drafting their learning logs. The trick, I would say, is to blend theory and case studies (real life examples) with reflective writing. This approach accommodates the requirements of UK Higher Education. I hope you find these slides useful, which will form a lecture to marketing students next Monday.

Reflective Writing

Courtesy of Dr. Emma Coonan, Information Skills Librarian at University of East Anglia (via the lively LISLINK forum) the adventurously titled ‘how to read 20 books (or thereabouts) in an hour’ is a gem for those students on a mind-blowingly tight deadline. The technique she uses used was just selective skimming – directing attention at key parts of the text (abstract, introduction, conclusion, headings, figures, first line of each paragraph) and not allowing oneself to get drawn in to reading continuously. She stresses to students that as well as allowing them to understand the work very quickly, it also enables them to check the consistency of the argumentative structure, see if it all hangs together, and make a preliminary evaluation of the work based on its relevance and quality. Students would then be in a position to decide whether they wanted to scan through any sections in greater detail, or even go back and read the whole thing – or whether they had enough information about the purpose of the work and could reassign it to the ‘done’ pile! The presentation slides and the handout are CC licensed and available from https://researchcentral.wordpress.com/2012/04/23/academic-reading-and-writing/.

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http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/courses/Documentation/10_books_an_hour.pdf

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Twitter is amazing facility where you can keep up to date with the latest news about anything you’re interested in (without saying of course, but I had to start somewhere). But do you know that you can follow the Library @GCWLibrary on Twitter to catch up with our news? Real-time. Recent posts cover the More Books service, pertinent exam support, 24 hr opening which lasts until 15th May,  and the #JustAsk enquiry service. There’s also a Twitter feed on this blog too.

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