Posts tagged study skills

I find it always worth looking or…(let’s be honest) rather investigate what materials are being produced in the Higher Education sector, and particularly those made by university teams (in this case ‘My Library Essentials Team’) who win awards for their valuable work. Last year, the University of Manchester won the prestigious Blackboard Catalyst Award for their amazing portfolio of study skills articulate videos, amassing some seventeen options embedded on their webpage ranging from booking a workshop to advice on writing and revising for exams.  You can browse or search their workshops and online resources, and filter your results by selecting or deselecting the tags.  As you can see below I’ve chosen their ‘Being Critical: Thinking, reading and writing critically’ video which can also be downloaded as a pdf, as well as Better safe than sorry: proofreading your work, and Down to Business: finding business information

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Being critical: thinking, reading and writing critically

This resource explores how to be critical, highlighting practical strategies you can use in your academic reading and writing that will enable you to demonstrate critical analysis in your assignments.

Better safe than sorry: proofreading your work

This resource explores three vital elements to review when proofreading your work – flow, clarity and accuracy – and gives you a chance to learn about and apply some techniques to ensure that you check your work properly.

  • Duration: 15 minutes
  • Format: Online tutorial

and then this….

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Down to business: finding business information

This set of resources introduces a number of powerful research tools you can use to get a range of business information. It includes practical demonstrations of the Fame (company information), Passport (market research) and Factiva (trade and industry news) databases.

  • Duration: 15 minutes (each)
  • Format: Video

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Josh Zhang, our Library International Co-ordinator, has launched a blog aimed at improving the international student experience at the University of Lincoln. Today, Josh has published his first post outlining his role and his hopes for further supporting the library and research needs of international students.

欢迎大家来关注 (‘welcome to follow our blog’ in Mandarin).

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http://internationallibrary.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/2015/04/08/library-support-for-international-students/

At the University of Lincoln we are fortunate enough to use Talis reading lists which links books in our collection to specific modules, enabling students to easily identify where print books are located in the library as well as giving them access to journal articles and ebooks off campus. Likewise, on this blog I like to showcase the past three months’ worth of newly acquired books that support the Business School.  This interactive reading list is updated every week to illustrate what new titles and additional copies are available in the Library, so it’s worth checking the Business Librarian blog regularly.

 

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When carrying out a literature search you may be wondering where to start. Often students start making notes and this automatically becomes their essay, but if you adopt a systematic approach to research then your study experience will be a whole lot easier. If your essay is constructed from notes then you may not be aware of themed paragraphs and a logical argument or thread, and you might encounter a problem with structure. I would recommend the following approach when carrying out a literature review so you are properly organised and thorough:

1. carry out database research (see library.lincoln.ac.uk)

2. read abstract before saving document

3. compile list of keywords

4. consider themes for potential paragraphs

5. read articles and take notes

6. consider and reflect upon potential arguments

7. start drafting main body of your essay under themed headings

8. delete headings if necessary.

 

Are you aware that the Library holds drop-in sessions and workshops throughout the year to support your studies?  Drop-in sessions range from Academic Writing Support (Monday 11-1, Wednesday 12-2pm, Thursday 2-4pm),  Academic Subject Librarians  (held at various times through the week), Maths and Stats help (Monday 1-4pm, Tuesday 10-1pm, Wednesday 1-4pm, Thursday 10-1pm), and IT support in the Library (Tuesday 2-3pm, Friday 2-3pm).  The Learning Development room, where these drop-in sessions take place, is located on the ground floor of the Library.  No need for an appointment – just turn up!

 

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An exciting new service for advice on academic writing has recently started in the Library with staff able to advise on a range of writing skills from grammar to structuring an assignment. Please email us at aws@lincoln.ac.uk to arrange a 1-1 appointment and bring along a draft assignment. To support this initiative there is a new libguide about the Academic Writing Support available at guides.library.lincoln.ac.uk/c.php?g=133466 complete  with informative tabs.  You can drop into any of our sessions in the Learning Development room at the end of the ground floor of the Library during the times listed below:

  • Monday – 11.00 – 13.00
  • Wednesday 13.00 – 15.00
  • Thursday 14.00 – 16.00

Running from left to right, our team consists of Judith Elkin, myself (Daren Mansfield) and Cheryl Cliffe.

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As part of a new series of videos on study skills at Lincoln, Tracy Lamping, a senior lecturer in the Business School, volunteers some insightful advice to students in re-editing their work and proof reading what they have written to increase their grade…her top tip for academic writing at university. Employing such scrutiny may achieve the difference between receiving a 2:1 and a First! Other useful videos are in the media pipeline, and will shortly be made available across various library subject guides.