Posts tagged video

Our database this week in our long-running theme is Mintel.

If you’ve ever wondered what the database Mintel is capable of then this short video is a neat overview. There’s an amazing amount of UK-based information covering a wide range of sectors, categories (from austerity and value to social media) to demographics (which includes millennials). You can download a range of data from spreadsheets, and then convert them into graphs for your assignments, as well as creating impressive reports.

For instance, there’s an impressive report on mobile phone, only just published, that has not only a report but a databook where the hyperlinks on the spreadsheet, once clicked, provides options like what operating system consumers are using as well as their age range.

Why not spend a few minutes selecting various options and seeing what it can do. If you need any help then please contact me and I’m more than happy to meet you, or advise you via email.

To access this database just go the library page > Find > Databases > M > Mintel.

This is a video I produced as part of the Teaching and Learning in Digital Education course I studied at the University of Lincoln. There are two versions of this video, one with a literature review and one without. This one contains a literature review. Both are available on YouTube.

Stella Cottrell, author of many books including the seminal Study Skills Handbook, explains what the 7 Approaches to Learning are in this short video, and covers what independent learning is all about such as devising active learning when you’re studying outside of the classroom so you become a successful and productive student.

When you’re a student information is everywhere. Plagiarism can be problematic when compiling lots of information from several different places, but it is something every student needs to be aware of. Thankfully, this plagiarism tutorial was produced by the Library and explains what plagiarism is and how to carry out good practice. You can test your knowledge at the end.

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In anticipation of the forthcoming induction / Welcome Week we have produced a useful slideshow on how to use the library using Prezi (presentation software,  if you’ve never come across it before). We hope you find it informative and like the novel way the answers appear and retreat when using the arrows.

We will be joining the SCONUL virtual out-of-hours enquiry service, based on the OCLC QuestionPoint service. The service allows libraries to offer a 24 hour, 365 days a year enquiry service, meaning that there will be a integrated chat and e-mail provision. As an interesting aside, I have embedded a video about how a library used the service in compiling digitised photographs of early 20th century Filipino coffee shops.

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For anyone interested in using Refworks, the referencing software, you may be wondering about where to download some helpguides, or receive a paper mountain of step-by-step how to guides. In the interests of the environment (last month was the hottest April on record) I thought it was a good idea to highlight where to find even better help if you have any questions (you can, of course, email refworks@lincoln.ac.uk). On the Refworks webpage (library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > Refworks) at the top right-hand corner of the screen you will find a link to the Refworks Community, ideal for the inquisitive reference organiser where an assortment of videos is stored.

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Do you know that we have recently subscribed to Oxford University Press Journals (OUP) which is available through the Library homepage (library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > databases > O > Oxford University Press Journals)? This presents a wonderful opportunity to browse the tabs Journals A-Z, and the Arts & Humanities, Law, Medicine & Health, Science & Mathematics, and most importantly for business, Social Sciences. The OUP is an integral part of Oxford University, which this marketing video smartly conveys:

Also, I could not resist from exploring World Literature and Roger Luckhurst from Birkbeck College discussing the readability of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, which he surmises is one of the most entertaining novels ever written. What will you find in OUP?

There’s also a fascinating OUP blog piece entitled ‘A timeline of academic publishing at Oxford University Press‘ that illustrates the history of printing the written word in England from 1450. For the 42 journals we have access to as part of our subscription please select this link: http://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/Provider/1710?lang=en&lang.menu=en&lang.subject=en&providerId=494&providerName=Oxford%20University%20Press&resourceType=all&resourceTypeName=allTitles

 

Office 365: Instructions for Students

With the start of the new academic year, all students receive access to Microsoft Office 365. As part of this service, students can install Microsoft Office on their personal computing devices (PCs, Macs, tablets and phones), have access to MS Office 365 online services and are provided with 1TB of personal online storage space.

You may be wondering how to can plan an assignment using our library resources? There is an easy way to design an essay structure using our library search engine, Find it at Lincoln. Using themed searches 5 or 6 times (depending on the length of your assignment) you can email relevant journal articles and save them on your student profile. These folders could become the main body of your assignment, with each folder representing a paragraph. Your introduction would simply be an explanation of what you are going to cover, whilst your conclusion is the summary of your reading.

Courtesy of the on-screen recording software Camtasia, I’ve recorded a presentation with an embedded video which includes my overdubbed narration. This presentation will be rolled out during the Freshers’ Week in a few days’ time to various subjects I support.

I’ve always found LinkedIn, the world’s largest business networking site, a really useful way of connecting with colleagues and those associated with the University of Lincoln. It’s also a way of connecting of ex-colleagues. You may legitimately describe it as Facebook for work purposes. I have embedded a neat video on using LinkedIn for the uninitiated, which might whet your appetite if you haven’t got an account (of course, it’s free). Or at least the version I use is free. I also like the LinkedIn Pulse feature which has a vast range of such interesting articles – you can follow them on Twitter @LinkedInPulse. You might also decide to become a self-publishing author on LinkedIn, a tentative step which I haven’t yet undertaken.