Business School subject split – 1st June

Although this message was originally posted in March this year, I thought it was important to re-announce that from 1st June 2015 subject support for the Business School will be split along the following lines:

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Daren will support…Accountancy and Finance, Advertising and Marketing, Economics, Events Management, International Business, Languages, Tourism, Lincoln College.

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Martin will support…Business, Business & Management, Management, MBA, Professional Development, North Lindsey College .

Our (amicable) separation is not divorce though, as both Daren and Martin will continue to work closely together as we remain part-time and unable to cover the week individually. A range of libguides will shortly be published to support these various subjects.

Thinking critically with Daniel Dennett

During this season of high octane exam stress students are considering how to argue critically and structure a logical argument. One of the best blogs (and certainly one of my favourites) to investigate with this in mind is Maria Popova’s brilliant Brain Pickings which covers book reviews and discusses philosophical ideas (and a blog one can only aspire to). You can also follow Maria on @brainpicker on Twitter or her enlightening blog on @brainpickings. In How to Criticize with Kindness: Philosopher Daniel Dennett on the Four Steps to Arguing Intelligently post Dennett suggests how to compose a successful critical commentary:

  1. You should attempt to re-express your target’s position so clearly, vividly, and fairly that your target says, “Thanks, I wish I’d thought of putting it that way”.
  2. You should list any points of agreement (especially if they are not matters of general or widespread agreement).
  3. You should mention anything you have learned from your target.
  4. Only then are you permitted to say so much as a word of rebuttal or criticism.

Moreover, Daniel also has suggested seven famous tools for thinking available at: http://schoolofthinking.org/2013/06/daniel-dennetts-seven-tools-for-thinking/ which include use your mistakes, respect your opponent, don’t waste your time on rubbish and Employ Occam’s Razor (you’ll have to select the link for an explanation better than I could ever attempt)…

 

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Daniel, critically voyaging into consciousness

 

http://www.brainpickings.org/2014/03/28/daniel-dennett-rapoport-rules-criticism/

Why not follow @GCW Library on Twitter?

Twitter is amazing facility where you can keep up to date with the latest news about anything you’re interested in (without saying of course, but I had to start somewhere). But do you know that you can follow the Library @GCWLibrary on Twitter to catch up with our news? Real-time. Recent posts cover the More Books service, pertinent exam support, 24 hr opening which lasts until 15th May,  and the #JustAsk enquiry service. There’s also a Twitter feed on this blog too.

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Jorum: a vast reservoir of helpful study resources

At this time many students at Lincoln, and without doubt elsewhere, are strenuously revising for exams and submitting voluminous  dissertations. It might be useful to peruse what the HE sector at large offers in terms of advice and support during this hectic period. Jorum qualifies as the UK’s largest repository for discovering and sharing Open Educational Resources for HE, FE and Skills. After browsing the substantial archive (a search for exam skills elicits 47 results, whilst a search for critical thinking receives 225 results), I chose Robert Falmer’s (from the University of Northampton) Critical Thinking: Exploring Flaws and Weaknesses in Arguments Xertes video from last year available through the Creative Commons licence.  Mostly suitable for first year undergraduate students, Robert explains the flaws and weaknesses in arguments within a critical thinking context by presenting three sets of three flawed arguments, with questions and feedback for each argument.

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Manchester’s amazing portfolio of academic skills videos

I find it always worth looking or…(let’s be honest) rather investigate what materials are being produced in the Higher Education sector, and particularly those made by university teams (in this case ‘My Library Essentials Team’) who win awards for their valuable work. Last year, the University of Manchester won the prestigious Blackboard Catalyst Award for their amazing portfolio of study skills articulate videos, amassing some seventeen options embedded on their webpage ranging from booking a workshop to advice on writing and revising for exams.  You can browse or search their workshops and online resources, and filter your results by selecting or deselecting the tags.  As you can see below I’ve chosen their ‘Being Critical: Thinking, reading and writing critically’ video which can also be downloaded as a pdf, as well as Better safe than sorry: proofreading your work, and Down to Business: finding business information

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Being critical: thinking, reading and writing critically

This resource explores how to be critical, highlighting practical strategies you can use in your academic reading and writing that will enable you to demonstrate critical analysis in your assignments.

Better safe than sorry: proofreading your work

This resource explores three vital elements to review when proofreading your work – flow, clarity and accuracy – and gives you a chance to learn about and apply some techniques to ensure that you check your work properly.

  • Duration: 15 minutes
  • Format: Online tutorial

and then this….

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Down to business: finding business information

This set of resources introduces a number of powerful research tools you can use to get a range of business information. It includes practical demonstrations of the Fame (company information), Passport (market research) and Factiva (trade and industry news) databases.

  • Duration: 15 minutes (each)
  • Format: Video