Financial Times Business School video series

Whilst researching for a couple of Financial Times workshops to be held in the Library this November, I stumbled across the Financial Times Business School which publishes several videos presented by Della Bradshaw, the Business Education Editor at the Financial Times. In this video, Della interviews Hamid Boucihki, Professor of Management and Entrepreneurship at Essec Ventures on the key challenges of business schools, such as fierce competition, accelerating technology, the threat of MOOCs, just-in-time education, for-profit colleges, online MBAs and the need for universities to re-invent the model such as workplace placements and providing first-class opportunities to enhance employability. This interview is one of a series discussing business education, and something which I found to be particularly interesting. After listening to the video series, the key question facing a prospective student is what will the return on their investment is going to be should they enrol on a business course, while companies are looking for global leadership.

Be a Steampunk in the Library!

Steampunkery in the Library! Between 1pm and 3pm as part of Welcome Week students can try on Steampunk costumes; top hat, bowler, pith helmet, corsets, waistcoats, braces,  lace and frippery etc. on the ground floor of the library. Join us next to the new display case on the ground floor. Our model is Oonagh Monaghan, the Academic Subject Librarian for Psychology, Sport & Education captured earlier in the week on her way to work. By sheer coincidence, Lincoln hosts Europe’s largest gathering celebrating Steampunk culture, an annual event collectively known as ‘The Asylum’.

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Blackwell’s bookshop @ Lincoln

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The Blackwell’s Bookshop is now open on the left-hand side of the Library when you enter the building, before the turnstiles. In some bundles (part 1 0r part 2) students receives as much as 25% discount, whilst other books are sold at 5% discount.  There are also copies of David Gray’s much sought after Financial Update 2015/16.

Their opening hours are Monday to Friday 10am-4pm.

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2nd edition of Harvard Referencing guide

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Following feedback from students and academic staff, the all new 2nd edition now features:

  • extended guidance on how to reference
  • all new examples
  • additional annotated diagrams
  • an index to help you locate sources.

Print copies of the Harvard referencing guide are freely available for students to collect from the Library.

http://library.lincoln.ac.uk/home/learning-teaching/referencing/

Library induction news

  • New entry gates which will make access a lot easier;
  • New improved thin client PCs with updated software and much better processing power so they can handle video at full screen;
  • Twelve replacement Macs;
  • Increased budget – additional £30k for Reading List books;
  • More 24/7 opening – starting 5th October;
  • A better organised and more up-to-date stock (thanks to extensive weeding and stock moves);
  • Permanent display case on the Ground Floor – coming soon ‘Steampunks’;
  • Online 3D Maps – currently under development;
  • Better water fountain on the Ground Floor (+ possibility of water on upper floors too);
  • Office 2016  (the mac version of 365) has already been rolled out to the Macs on the 1st floor;
  • More ‘user friendly’ Eating and Drinking policy.

Office 365 @ Uni of Lincoln

Office 365: Instructions for Students

With the start of the new academic year, all students receive access to Microsoft Office 365. As part of this service, students can install Microsoft Office on their personal computing devices (PCs, Macs, tablets and phones), have access to MS Office 365 online services and are provided with 1TB of personal online storage space.

5 easy steps to a successful essay plan

You may be wondering how to can plan an assignment using our library resources? There is an easy way to design an essay structure using our library search engine, Find it at Lincoln. Using themed searches 5 or 6 times (depending on the length of your assignment) you can email relevant journal articles and save them on your student profile. These folders could become the main body of your assignment, with each folder representing a paragraph. Your introduction would simply be an explanation of what you are going to cover, whilst your conclusion is the summary of your reading.

2015 Library induction video with narration

Courtesy of the on-screen recording software Camtasia, I’ve recorded a presentation with an embedded video which includes my overdubbed narration. This presentation will be rolled out during the Freshers’ Week in a few days’ time to various subjects I support.

EndNote tutorial support on YouTube

This is our 200th post on the Business Librarian blog! By way of commemorating this major milestone I have decided to announce that I’ve just attended some further EndNote training, which is referencing software generally used by, although not exclusively, postgraduates and academics.  At first it can be hard learning something as multi-layered as EndNote. Learning Refworks for instance, another referencing software package we subscribe to, took a little while to fully understand. Only when producing lesson plans and responding to student queries did the referencing penny finally drop and I was able to master Refworks.  Following an instructor is worthwhile, but it doesn’t match a practical (let’s say problem-solving)) approach of dealing with obstacles, because making mistakes is important. Indeed there is almost entire discipline on making mistakes and it is recognised by theorists that mistakes are an integral part of the learning process and a key component in assembling self-reflective values. Why not check out Rolková & Janošková’s (2014) Employee mistakes as a necessary way of learning in companies in Proceedings of the Multidisciplinary Academic Conference if you are interested in the scholarly literature out there? I digress. Fortunately our esteemed colleague, the Academic Subject Librarian for Journalism is currently producing a guide and EndNote does own a YouTube account which holds many helpful online tutorials, one of which is a 25-minute starter called ‘EndNote on Windows’.

Is a thesaurus a dinosaur or a critically endangered species?

The web is scattered with references to why or what a thesaurus is; an unidentified or forgotten dinosaur or something even worse that is becoming increasingly endangered (a book that is chronically under-read). To be more accurate a a thesaurus is a reference tool used to locate synonyms (words that are similar in meaning to a particular word) or antonyms (words that are the opposite meaning of a particular word). Gorgeously derived from the Latin thēsaurus, meaning treasury from Greek thēsauros. Thesauri can be used to clarify the meaning of an unfamiliar word when its definition in a dictionary can’t be understood, and may be useful for a non-native speaker to expand vocabulary. I know, for instance, that I consistently use adverbs to strengthen a sentence. In my opinion, using MS Word by right clicking on a particular word does not elicit a wide enough range of words, and limits composition. Admittedly this function is extremely convenient but is the lazy option, and is not always the best route to literary success.

The most common use of a thesaurus is to avoid word repetition, to find substitutes, and prevent the monotonous overuse of a term in writing or speech. Similarly, a thesaurus is used to identify replacements for words that seem too common or dull, e.g., “see” might be replaced by “view.” This alternate vocabulary suggested by a thesaurus can be used to create texts that are more interesting and engaging because of the richer language that is used. But be careful! Sometimes the synonyms do not contain the same feeling or nuance as the original word and students might skew the meaning of a sentence and confuse the reader . In order to make sure you are not using a word with a different feeling, do a “cross check” of the new word by checking its own definition to make sure it matches the feeling you want. This technique weaves sophistication into the writing process.

Whether you retain a printed copy on your desk, bookmark a favourite website, or download an app to your smartphone, your writing will improve with frequent use of a thesaurus. In addition, you will learn new vocabulary in the process of looking up synonyms or their antonyms and no doubt become a better writer! Yet making mistakes is essential to becoming a better writer as the Nobel Prize-winning author William Faulkner said in his 1958 Paris Review interview: ‘Teach yourself by your own mistakes; people learn only by error’.  Through trial and error, writing becomes easier. Faulkner said reverse the medium, let the story write itself and your style will evolve, instead of considering your style first to write the story. A thesaurus is one of the tools of the trade.

The Library holds several Thesauri in our collection, generally located within the 423 section on the first floor.  Perhaps the most famous thesaurus is Roget’s edition. A by-product of writing this review is that I have re-ignited my interest in using a thesaurus more.

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Resit week reminder

for students: This is a reminder that resit week is taking place the week commencing Monday 3rd August. If you have a resit exam this will be taking place between Monday 3rd August and Friday 7th August. The date and time of the exam will be available on your timetable now. All resit coursework must be uploaded to Blackboard via turnitin by 23.59m on Monday 3rd August. Please note hard copies will not be accepted.

If you are submitting a languages resit assessment a hard copy must be handed in only. You do not need to submit via turnitin.

If you have any questions about resits please contact UGadmin-business@lincoln.ac.uk

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Becoming an avid blogger: blogging tips from a Subject Librarian

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Back from hols now! This is a post I wrote for the CILIP blog and was published on the 20th July. In my opinion blogging does include choosing a style, not taking yourself too seriously and so forth, but the main driving principle is to simply do it. Practising the art is not about making everything perfect (for that is the charm of blogging), but it’s about regularly maintaining a social media presence and overcoming fear. It can be scary entering such a huge forum, but after a while you’re looking at notifications, feedback, comments to prove that it’s actually working and promoting whatever you’re writing about. In my case I am keen to promote the University Library and its resources for research. My best hope is that this CILIP piece may encourage some to start blogging or at least get others to post more frequently and find their voice in the blogosphere.

http://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/blog/becoming-avid-blogger-blogging-tips-subject-librarian#comment-2148001684

 

 

Using LinkedIn: Facebook for work purposes?

I’ve always found LinkedIn, the world’s largest business networking site, a really useful way of connecting with colleagues and those associated with the University of Lincoln. It’s also a way of connecting of ex-colleagues. You may legitimately describe it as Facebook for work purposes. I have embedded a neat video on using LinkedIn for the uninitiated, which might whet your appetite if you haven’t got an account (of course, it’s free). Or at least the version I use is free. I also like the LinkedIn Pulse feature which has a vast range of such interesting articles – you can follow them on Twitter @LinkedInPulse. You might also decide to become a self-publishing author on LinkedIn, a tentative step which I haven’t yet undertaken.

YouTube video on finding newspapers via Lexis Library

Lexis Library is a fantastic database which covers UK national and regional newspapers and is available via Library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > databases > L > Lexis Library.  The Library Service at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) has kindly uploaded a short YouTube video on how to find newspapers and narrow the results to tailor to your research needs.  I would recommend Lexis Library to all students wishing to contextualise their research and ‘hook’ the reader into their assignment. Using newspapers makes the assignment current, interesting and shows a knowledge of wider issues.

PS. There is an option to watch the video full screen at the bottom right-hand corner below.