The Business Librarian Blog joins Twitter

The time has finally come to create a work-related Twitter account to relentlessly publicise the Business Librarian blog and its content.  180+ posts and counting since its inception in 2011. As you know, I blog regularly throughout the working week and would like to (shamelessly some might say) generate more hits. Join me in my quest to promote the University Library to Business School students @LINCLibrarian.

In addition the great joy about setting up a work account is that I am able to link to subject-related journals, magazines, newspapers and organisations that I’ve been familiar with for several years in my role as subject librarian for Accountancy and Finance, Advertising and Marketing, Economics, Events Management, International Business, Modern Languages and Tourism.

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Mobile phone sales in Vietnam? Check out the Euromonitor database

Often students struggle on how to start an assignment which asks them about entering a new market with a product of their choice. Which product and what country to invest in? How can they see what the market volume is and whether it is worth entering a country where the market has a healthy forecast? Help is at hand. Fortunately, Euromonitor has the answer to these questions and much more, particularly as I have been exploring the wizardry Dashboard feature (below) on the database which provides the researcher with useful market size and insightful forecast, meaning they can learn if a market has potential or has reached saturation point. The following six-step instructions is a method to easily answer an international business assignment within a few well-spent minutes.

Purely hypothetically if I am interested in selling smartphones in Vietnam via shopping outlets does this idea have any business potential. Simply, is it worth investing in?

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1. Firstly, go to library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > E > Euromonitor.

2. On the homepage go to Choose Industry > Consumer Electronics > Dashboard > GO.

3. Table 1 below shows the market size of consumer electronics (dark blue showing the greatest)

Table 1: Consumer Electronics Dashboard (Market Size)

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4. This map can be changed to forecast (on the top left-hand side) to show forecast, to find out whether a growth area like India or far-eastern Asia is worth investing in, and immediately we can see the darker blue areas are worth investigating further.

Table 2: Consumer Electronics (Forecast Growth)

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5. If we select Channel View from the tabs we can appreciate that some of far-eastern Asia sells a double-figure growth in consumer electronics using store-based retailing.

Table 3: Store-Based Retailing (Historic Growth)

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6. Choose category > Portable Consumer Appliances > Mobile Phones. We can see that from Table 4 the paler blue areas might be worth investigating, like Vietnam. We can hover our mouse over an area and break the data into smaller chunks.

Table 4: Mobile Phones (market size)

 

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Table 5: Mobile Phones (forecast growth)

 

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From Table 5 we can see that consumer electronics are a boom area in Vietnam and selling mobile phones via store-based retailing is worth investing in. Indeed, by hovering the mouse over the country we can see that mobile phones sales are predicted to grow an amazing 13.7%. From these simple steps we can see that it is possible not only to find an idea for an assignment using Euromonitor but we are able to plan the structure too. We can also drill down further into whether we are selling Smartphones, or another mobile phone product. Market wizardry in a snapshot!

 

Subject split today!

From today Martin Osborne and myself will be supporting different subjects within the Business School meaning that I will be supporting:

Whilst Martin Osborne will support Business, Business & Management, Management, MBA, and Professional Development.

 

Euromonitor database video

At the University of Lincoln we have many relevant programmes where the database Euromonitor International is such a key resource such as Business and Marketing, International Business, International Tourism Business, Human Resources, Logistics, MBA and Social Research. In addition to these courses other departments such as Lincoln School of Film & Media, National Centre for Food Manufacturing (NCFM), Sport and Exercise Science are seeing the benefit of using this resource.

Euromonitor has access to 80 countries for both Industries and Countries and Consumers, and cross-comparable statistics as well as different types of analysis so why not take a look at the video outlining some of these features.

Euromonitor can be found via library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > databases > E > Euromonitor.

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New subject library guides

From 1st June Business School subjects will be split meaning that Martin Osborne will support Business, Business & Management, Management, MBA, and Professional Development.

I have published subject guides for the courses I will support from next Monday:

Daren Mansfield, Academic Subject Librarian for all of the above….CaptureDarenPoster14

Business School subject split – 1st June

Although this message was originally posted in March this year, I thought it was important to re-announce that from 1st June 2015 subject support for the Business School will be split along the following lines:

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Daren will support…Accountancy and Finance, Advertising and Marketing, Economics, Events Management, International Business, Languages, Tourism, Lincoln College.

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Martin will support…Business, Business & Management, Management, MBA, Professional Development, North Lindsey College .

Our (amicable) separation is not divorce though, as both Daren and Martin will continue to work closely together as we remain part-time and unable to cover the week individually. A range of libguides will shortly be published to support these various subjects.

Why not follow @GCW Library on Twitter?

Twitter is amazing facility where you can keep up to date with the latest news about anything you’re interested in (without saying of course, but I had to start somewhere). But do you know that you can follow the Library @GCWLibrary on Twitter to catch up with our news? Real-time. Recent posts cover the More Books service, pertinent exam support, 24 hr opening which lasts until 15th May,  and the #JustAsk enquiry service. There’s also a Twitter feed on this blog too.

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#ShareMyThesis competition

In addition to my earlier post about EthOs, the British Library’s digitised theses service where over 140,000 theses are available for download, the British Library launched a prestigious #ShareMyThesis competition where competitors challenged each other on Twitter to inventively summarise their thesis in 140 characters and write a 600 word summary. The top prize went to Sarah Wiseman, who now works as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University College London and Open University for the passionate tweet #ShareMyThesis Typing numbers wrongly in hospitals can kill people. Understanding why it happens can help design better systems and stop it!  Sarah’s outstanding thesis is available here…yet another reason why EthOs is worth exploring, which is found under our database section (library.lincoln.ac.uk > resources > databases > E > EthOs…)

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Capture sarah theSarah Wiseman, winner of #Sharemythesis competition.

EthOs e-theses online service from the British Library

Not many people may be aware of the incredible service that the British Library is now offering in terms of digitising theses across the UK and uploading them onto a database called EthOs. Fortunately the University of Lincoln does subscribe to this facility where you can download or order a copy, and we are proudly able to claim that some 350 of its PhD theses are available on EthOs.  These links can be easily be shared via a plethora of social media such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc…

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We are hoping that Nono Wibisono’s recent PhD entitled ‘Destination image: perception, experience and behavioural intent in the context of West Java, Indonesia as a tourist destination’ is soon added to EthOs as it’s certainly worth reading. This thesis is currently being added to the University of Lincoln’s hard-copy theses collection on the ground floor of the Library, behind the issue desk. Whatever your level of study I find it a useful exercise to browse through a PhD thesis to appreciate the depth of a literature review, how the references are threaded together in a logical debate and learn how to write in an academic style, of which Wibisono’s is a fine example.

More Books for UGs ends on 15th May

Just to let you know that our More Books service for undergraduate students will be closing on the 15th May, so if you want a book to be added to the library collection please submit your request before this deadline. More Books for Research will remain open for postgraduate students and researchers and is available at http://lncn.eu/pu57.

The More Books service for undergraduates will return in the Autumn.

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 http://library.lincoln.ac.uk/home/more-books/

The Library is still open 24/7 until 15th May

Ever wished there were more hours in the day to study in our Library? Well, this is a reminder to all those students completing their dissertations and assignments, and starting to revise for exams, the Library is still open 24-7 until 15th May.

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http://library.lincoln.ac.uk/home/customer-information/opening-times/#247

Online tutorial on the Marketline database

Marketline is a very popular database used for market research purposes where researching country information, industry and company profiles is available. It is also good for international business for students wishing to find out about businesses outside of the United Kingdom. Please view Marketline’s video which gives an overview of the database, and an insight into its formidable potential. I would recommend some investigation into the database section of Marketline where you can generate some very interesting and unique charts, such as one I have just conducted on broadband activity in Afghanistan.  Why not try to generate a chart to test Marketline’s impressive archive?