Tourism Help Guide

An updated guide to help you locate useful tourism information including local statistics and web specific information.

Finding Information for Tourism 12 13

Euromonitor International – Passport GMID is now live!

The Library has recently upgraded Euromonitor International to the Passport GMID version, which means you can access daily industry news, select relevant articles and analyse the latest business and marketing information. You are also able to access all the daily country and consumer articles and detailed reports by accessing any of the homepages within the countries and consumers tab.  A useful feature is to compare various products in a number of countries, and choosing factors like currencies, exchange rates, and year-on-year growth (%). Such data would greatly enhance your marketing research.

There are a variety of help videos available to enhance your understanding of GMID .

If you need any support in using this database then please email: businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk

Passport GMID User Guide

Book of the Month: Stephen Bailey’s Academic Writing for International Students of Business (2011)

For international students, it’s sometimes hard to understand UK academic culture when beginning their studies.  October’s Book of the Month, Stephen Bailey’s Academic writing for international students of business (2011) proposes a logical framework from which to draw success from academia. Often the simplest methods are the most successful. Indeed, there are formulas available for anyone willing to incorporate them into their personal writing style, such as identifying problems and finding solutions (problem > solution A > arguments against solution A > solutions B and C….).  Acquiring these easy solutions that are liberally peppered throughout the book, would not only help international students, but boost UK students (and staff) writing styles too.

For instance, I found the section on organising paragraphs the most useful, whilst earlier chapters seemed light and too practise-centred, but that, as they say, is all in the design, structurally planned to hook the reader into digesting the entire book.  Organising paragraphs into topic sentence > example 1 > Example 2 > might sound mechanical, too formulaic, un-natural even, but it’s a good beginners technique; building blocks on which to build more sophisticated techniques later on.  Dealing with a single topic, constructing a paragraph of no less than for or five sentences, understanding the visual appeal of a well-determined structure, offering the first sentence as introducing the topic, while adding definitions, examples, information, reasons, restatements and summaries; guiding the reader through clearly presented arguments, are keys to unlock your academic potential.

Planning and precise note-taking is central to organising an effective, clearly presented essay. Having the patience and dedication to craft this technique no doubt becomes easier with practise.  Take the art of summarising a topic by drawing an idea-packed mindmap or spider-gram, cohesively linking key ideas together into a readable structure, makes writing effective. Likewise, organising an argument around defining potential drawbacks > benefits > discussion > economic > ethical > social > discussion is another useful formula. Creating balance of impersonal phrases (‘it is widely accepted that’) versus minority viewpoint (‘some people believe that’), adding counter-arguments and your personal position without sounding too subjective, to add colour and interest weaves depth into an academic critique.

If you would like to read more, and perhaps develop your academic writing, then copies are available at 808.06665 bai on the second floor of the GCW. The Library has a large established, and perhaps under-used, collection of essay writing on the second floor (808 on the second floor). I certainly have benefitted from occasionally using the collection and appreciate it as a rich source of guidance, both for myself (well, you be the judge!) and supporting students in their studies. To develop your creative writing beyond Bailey’s book, then I would recommend Fairfax and Moat’s marvellous The Way to Write (1981), a beginners guide to good writing skills found at 808.066 fai. For an entertaining read,  the great Keith Waterhouse’s Waterhouse on Newspaper Style  is well worth reading for an insight into British journalism. There are plenty of other invaluable books in the academic writing section to expand your writing skills, like Derek Soles ‘The Academic Essay’  available at 808.066 sol.

 

Finding Business information help guide

Finding Information for Business 12-13

This updated Business guide includes all the major resources at The University of Lincoln, referring in particular to the new Library website found at http://library.lincoln.ac.uk. We are currently upgrading all our help guides for the Business School to incorporate the changes listed in an earlier blog post called ‘What’s new in the Library‘.

Accountancy and Finance Workshops

Daren and myself will be running a series of drop in workshops next week, w/c 24th Sept in arrangement with Siobhan Goggin.

The times are:

Mon 24th Sept – 9 til 10 and 11 til 12

Tues 25th Sept – 11 til 12 and 12 til 1

Weds 26th Sept – 9 til 10, 10 til 11 and 11 til 12

Fri 28th Sept – 9 til 10, 10 til 11 and 11 til 12.

We will be covering the new ‘Find it at Lincoln’ search engine, demonstrating FAME and Marketline Advantage, as well as showing you where to find company reports and journal articles.

A folder has been placed behind the main library desk, so please book on as soon as possible as places are strictly limited to 20 students per session.

The help guide to accompany this session is below:

Finding Information for Accountancy and Finance 12-13

Business School Library presentation

Standard Induction 2012a

Welcome to the University of Lincoln if you’re new, and welcome back if you’re returning to Lincoln to continue your studies! This informative presentation outlines what the Library offers, plus some new things for the returners…Martin and I are appearing at various times throughout Welcome Week to deliver inductions based on this PowerPoint presentation. We will be running workshops soon, and look forward to meeting you either in your groups or individually.

The Library Coffee Event

Announcing the return of the Coffee Lounge!

Coffee cup

When: Tuesday 18th September

Where: The Library ground floor

What time: Between 10am – 2pm

You feel like some free coffee and cake?

Fancy a chat about the services the Library has to offer?

Or just want to sit down with a nice hot drink and relax after rushing around the Freshers’ Fayre?

The Library Coffee Lounge is a chance for you to find out about the services the Library provides in a more relaxed and informal setting.
It is an opportunity for you to get to know the Academic Subject Librarians and the Customer Service team.
But it’s also a chance for us to welcome you to the Library and to the University for a new academic year.

We hope to see you there!

Library Induction Lectures!

Hello all and WELCOME to the University of Lincoln.

Just as a gentle reminder here is a run down of Library Inductions for w/c 17th Sept 2012:

Thursday 20th Sept

13.30 – 14.00 Accountancy & Finance BL1101

14.30 – 15.00 Tourism BL1102 (Moot Court)

15.00 – 15.30 Marketing & Advertising BL1101

Friday 21st Sept

09.00 – 09.30 Business BL1101

09.30 – 10.00 Business & Managment BL1101

11.30 – 12.00 LBS Direct Entry Students BL1101

 

We look forward to seeing you all there!

How to locate databases on the new Library website

By way of explanation, I’ve produced a step-by-step guide on how to find resources, such as business databases, on the new Library website. It’s a slightly different approach than last academic year, but it is easy to use and should enhance your research.

Simply go to the website address at:

http://library.lincoln.ac.uk/

On the right hand side of the screen you will see ‘Find it at Lincoln’

Within this box you can either search for research material such as journal articles and books, or just search the library catalogue (just tick the box underneath the search box). If you want to search specific resources then select ‘more resources’ below the search box. On the left hand side of the screen you will see ‘Resources’:

 

 

 

From the Resources section you will be able to search for a journal title (via the electronic journals a-z) or investigate databases, such as FAME or Mintel, by following the relevant links.

Welcome from your Academic Subject Librarians

This short introductory video of Martin Osborne and Daren Mansfield, Academic Subject Librarians for the Business School, took an incredible 18 takes to complete – which is the reason why we’re celebrating at the end! You may have to raise the volume on your computer…

Join us on Twitter!


Join the communication revolution and get tweeting to the Library! I’ve added the rolling Twitter account as a widget on the Business Librarian blog page if you would like to tweet….

Herzlich willkommen!

It was very good to meet several German students from the distance learning centre at Hamburg for a library induction yesterday.  They are studying in Lincoln for two weeks only, with another cohort arriving at the end of the month.

As Academic Subject Librarians for the Business School, Martin Osborne (on the left) and myself, Daren Mansfield (the other chap), wish you Viel Glück on your course!

Videos on how to conduct market research using two databases

Whilst comparing and contrasting various products in various countries may be useful in a business or marketing assignment, such multi-layered information is often hard to find, so I’m offering some guidance on these freshly-produced videos. It is worth remembering as business students such research is carried out by multinationals, particularly those considering expansion into new or emerging markets, or following a trend, so learning about database research has an employability value as well. At the bottom right-hand corner of each video there is a full-screen option available should you wish to enlarge the screen.

The first video shows you how to conduct market research on the Marketline (Datamonitor 360), using the example of bottled water and comparing its market value in Brazil, Colombia, Uruguay, and Venezuela; all of which can be downloaded into Excel.

The second video uses the database Global Market Information Database (Euromonitor International) to conduct research into the market sizes of cigarettes in Egypt, Tunisia, Iran and Saudi Arabia. Again these statistics can be downloaded into an Excel spreadsheet.

If you reference these videos correctly then you are able to insert them into your assignment or appendices, which could boost your quantitative evidence and your final grade. It may take a few moments to familiarise yourself with using these databases, but it would be worth the effort in the end.

Book of the Month: Easy Peasy Chinese: Mandarin Chinese for beginners

Since leaving school many years ago, embarking on several languages other than my native English tongue is an occasional hobby, ranging from Spanish, Greek, Polish and Turkish, but all have been carried out with the same predictable short-term enthusiasm and lack of commitment.  So, what caught my eye this month from selecting August’s Book of the Month was the hugely optimistic title: Easy Peasy Chinese: Mandarin Chinese for beginners (2007) by Dorling Kindersley, as though learning a language which is so different than English, is as easy as a walk in the park, or perhaps a pleasant afternoon spent in Beijing’s Shisanling National Park. You might be surprised by this colourfully illustrated book, which is accompanied by a jaunty CD that you’ll have to play several times to get a sense of this language. The trick, if there is one, is to pay attention to the CD and refer to the book without being distracted. If you’re learning a language whilst driving the car then it’s easy to drift off, and you’ve jumped from learning simple tones to the 43rd track bartering for fish at a Chinese market! Without pressing pause and replaying CD tracks it’s easy to skip some key learning. It’s also advisable to borrow other Mandarin Chinese books to support the CD, such a phrasebook listing days of the week, numbers and so forth. If you’d like to start learning Mandarin Chinese as I am trying to, then the book is located at  495.18 eas on the first floor of the Library. 祝你好運 (zhù nǐ háoyùn) – good luck in Mandarin Chinese!