Maths and Stats Help Extended Hours

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We would like to welcome Phil Assheton to the Library team and more specifically welcome him to MASH. Phil is our Maths specialist in MASH with a background in computing, maths and finance.  He’s gone part time in his other job, in financial modelling, to provide support at the centre on Thursdays and Fridays.  Many of you may recognize Phil as he’s been expertly volunteering with us for some time now.

Contact Phil directly Passheton@lincoln.ac.uk or via our general emailMASH@lincoln.ac.uk.

Having Phil on board has enabled us to offer more drop-in hours. MASH drop-in can be found in the Learning Development room on the ground floor of the Library.

Our hours are now:

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  Tuesday: 10-1

  Wednesday: 1- 4

  Thursday: 10-1

  Friday: 1- 4

Even More Books Launches for a Limited Time!

We are happy to welcome back More Books as your chance to tell the Library what you need for your academic study.

In December 2012, we expanded our collection by 58 items through fulfilling students’ requests. If you missed the opportunity, then now is your chance as even More Books starts today for a limited period only.

Are there resources that you can’t get hold of because there aren’t enough copies on the shelf or it is missing?  Or is there a book on a module reading list that the library does not have?  Have you found a book you need for your dissertation but the library does not have it? If the answer is yes to any of these please tell us via More Books!

Please complete the ‘More Books’ form at: http://lncn.eu/biju

Sconul Access online registration

SCONUL runs a scheme allowing you to use other academic libraries.

sconul acc

From Thursday 7th December new users can now register with the Sconul Access scheme online at www.access.sconul.ac.uk.

University of Lincoln students and staff are encouraged to register online, however Sconul cards will continue to be issued at the Library desk if requested. Incoming users from other institutions will need to bring a Sconul Access email introduction letter or stamped/signed Sconul Access card from their home institution and library/ID card. If you fall into a category below then you will be able to use the scheme:

Band A – Staff and research students

Band B – Part time, distance learning and placement students

Band C – Taught postgraduates

R- Reference only – Full-time undergraduates

 

Essay writing slides

It was one of the Eureka! moments, when reading study skills books over the summer, I found simple formulas to write well-crafted essays.  These formulas can be employed to structure the skeleton of an essay. It may sound simplistic but you can build on it by weaving scholarly material into your assignment, and may be the secret of your academic success. These slides are uploaded from an essay writing workshop presented earlier today, referring in part, to Stephen Bailey’s brilliant Academic Writing for International Students of Business available at 808.06665 bai on the second floor of the GCW .

Introduction to Essay Writing

More books please!

 

More Books is your chance to tell the Library what resources you need for your academic study.  More Books is an easy and straightforward way for you to influence what we buy.

We sometimes hear that there aren’t enough books in the library, but we need more specific information to act on.  Are there resources that you can’t get hold of because there aren’t enough copies on the shelf or it is missing?  Or is there a book on a module reading list that the library does not have?  Have you found a book you need for your dissertation but the library does not have it? If the answer is yes to any of these please tell us via More Books!

More Books includes a form for you to complete and gives us the details of the book and the reasons why you want us to buy.  From this information we can then purchase either the book or ebook and we will reply to you to tell you what we have done.

More Books is launched today (Monday the 13th January) and will run for a limited period only and so please make your requests as soon as possible.  It is only available to students and so will reflect your academic needs.

Click on the link to fill in the form and submit it: http://library.lincoln.ac.uk/home/customer-information/more-books/

 

Factiva log in improvements

The database for predominantly used to research international news sources, Factiva, has recently improved its log in access.

This means no more “network\” for this database; it also means that the A-to-Z/Find it at Lincoln will link directly to a specific journal title rather than just to the database homepage.

Example: the Lincolnshire Echo – http://lncn.eu/cky6

You can still find the database listed under http://www.library.lincoln.ac.uk > more resources > databases > F > Factiva…

And, if you didn’t already know, Factiva contains a Financial Times archive, alongside the ABI Inform database .

 

 

Extra SPSS Workshops

Just to let you know that Laura Pearson, our maths and stats colleague has added some more SPSS workshops to the MASH website.

Please email Laura at mash@lincoln.ac.uk to book you place

SPSS For Beginners –  28th November, 4-5 pm, Room UL101 in the Library

This is for you if you know SPSS is going to be part of your course and you’d like a brief overview of what it is and how to navigate around it. By the end of this session you will know how to input various forms of data, run some analysis to gain descriptives and frequencies.

 

SPSS For Intermediates – 5th December, 4-5 pm, Room UL101 in the Library

This is for you if you know a bit about SPSS, maybe had some work using SPSS in previous years and are a little rusty. By the end of this session you will know how to set up a data set for the different t-tests, to run the analysis and begin to interpret the output.

New Business School Distance Learners Guide Now Available!

Cartoon Student Grades

 

Helen Williams, our colleague in the Business School has put together a Library guide to help distance learning students. The link to the guide is here: Distance Learner subject guide.

We now have a tab on the Business School subject guide that redirects users to the Distance Learner guide.

As usual if you have any problems using or accessing our resources, contact Daren or Martin via the Business Librarian email.

New Business School Library website

It’s hot off the web press – the all-new Business School website for Library resources.  It includes many illuminating sections on recommended books, journals and websites, as well as new helpguides.  This site replaces the old subject pages formerly located on the Portal.

We are always interested in your feedback so there is an interactive poll located on the homepage – feel free to comment!

Tourism Help Guide

An updated guide to help you locate useful tourism information including local statistics and web specific information.

Finding Information for Tourism 12 13

Euromonitor International – Passport GMID is now live!

The Library has recently upgraded Euromonitor International to the Passport GMID version, which means you can access daily industry news, select relevant articles and analyse the latest business and marketing information. You are also able to access all the daily country and consumer articles and detailed reports by accessing any of the homepages within the countries and consumers tab.  A useful feature is to compare various products in a number of countries, and choosing factors like currencies, exchange rates, and year-on-year growth (%). Such data would greatly enhance your marketing research.

There are a variety of help videos available to enhance your understanding of GMID .

If you need any support in using this database then please email: businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk

Passport GMID User Guide

Book of the Month: Stephen Bailey’s Academic Writing for International Students of Business (2011)

For international students, it’s sometimes hard to understand UK academic culture when beginning their studies.  October’s Book of the Month, Stephen Bailey’s Academic writing for international students of business (2011) proposes a logical framework from which to draw success from academia. Often the simplest methods are the most successful. Indeed, there are formulas available for anyone willing to incorporate them into their personal writing style, such as identifying problems and finding solutions (problem > solution A > arguments against solution A > solutions B and C….).  Acquiring these easy solutions that are liberally peppered throughout the book, would not only help international students, but boost UK students (and staff) writing styles too.

For instance, I found the section on organising paragraphs the most useful, whilst earlier chapters seemed light and too practise-centred, but that, as they say, is all in the design, structurally planned to hook the reader into digesting the entire book.  Organising paragraphs into topic sentence > example 1 > Example 2 > might sound mechanical, too formulaic, un-natural even, but it’s a good beginners technique; building blocks on which to build more sophisticated techniques later on.  Dealing with a single topic, constructing a paragraph of no less than for or five sentences, understanding the visual appeal of a well-determined structure, offering the first sentence as introducing the topic, while adding definitions, examples, information, reasons, restatements and summaries; guiding the reader through clearly presented arguments, are keys to unlock your academic potential.

Planning and precise note-taking is central to organising an effective, clearly presented essay. Having the patience and dedication to craft this technique no doubt becomes easier with practise.  Take the art of summarising a topic by drawing an idea-packed mindmap or spider-gram, cohesively linking key ideas together into a readable structure, makes writing effective. Likewise, organising an argument around defining potential drawbacks > benefits > discussion > economic > ethical > social > discussion is another useful formula. Creating balance of impersonal phrases (‘it is widely accepted that’) versus minority viewpoint (‘some people believe that’), adding counter-arguments and your personal position without sounding too subjective, to add colour and interest weaves depth into an academic critique.

If you would like to read more, and perhaps develop your academic writing, then copies are available at 808.06665 bai on the second floor of the GCW. The Library has a large established, and perhaps under-used, collection of essay writing on the second floor (808 on the second floor). I certainly have benefitted from occasionally using the collection and appreciate it as a rich source of guidance, both for myself (well, you be the judge!) and supporting students in their studies. To develop your creative writing beyond Bailey’s book, then I would recommend Fairfax and Moat’s marvellous The Way to Write (1981), a beginners guide to good writing skills found at 808.066 fai. For an entertaining read,  the great Keith Waterhouse’s Waterhouse on Newspaper Style  is well worth reading for an insight into British journalism. There are plenty of other invaluable books in the academic writing section to expand your writing skills, like Derek Soles ‘The Academic Essay’  available at 808.066 sol.

 

Finding Business information help guide

Finding Information for Business 12-13

This updated Business guide includes all the major resources at The University of Lincoln, referring in particular to the new Library website found at http://library.lincoln.ac.uk. We are currently upgrading all our help guides for the Business School to incorporate the changes listed in an earlier blog post called ‘What’s new in the Library‘.