Goodbye to the Creative Review Handbook

The Creative Review Handbook has ceased publication. However there is a web site available at: www.chb.com

It seems to be free to view and is continuing for the foreseeable future.

The Economist: availability in Factiva to change

This is advance notice that effective 30 June 2012, The Economist will no longer be available in academic library subscriptions to Factiva.

However, you will still be able to access The Economist via our subscription to ABI/Inform without embargo.

If you would like any help accessing any of the databases available to you please email Daren Mansfield or Martin Osborne at businesslibrarian@lincoln.ac.uk

 

Accessing the Portal off campus video

Having trouble accessing the Portal off campus? This short video takes you through the various steps to gain access to the Portal’s electronic resources…

Exam and revision techniques

Have you ever wondered what your preferred learning style is? Help your revision techniques by downloading and completing this questionnaire, then read about your dominant learning style below. Techniques drawn from your learning style will enable you to revise more efficiently and tackle your exams with greater confidence.

3 Study Methods

Overcoming Science Direct access problems

Some of you, like me, have been experiencing problems accessing Science Direct. A message saying ‘Sorry, your request can’t be processed due to a system problem’ appears when you try to log on.  However, if you select the ‘Search’ tab at the top of the screen then you should be able to use the database without hindrance. The problem has been reported and we hope that it is resolved shortly.

Compare currencies on Factiva

If you’re wondering how to compare currencies then Factiva (Portal > Library > E-Library > Factiva) will provide you with some answers:

Go to Companies / Markets and choose currencies. Then choose from the drop-down menus the currencies you want to compare. You can obtain the current quote or the historical quote, daily, weekly or monthly price, and choose the date range (anything up to 2 yrs) then ‘get quote’. 

 

Results are shown in a spreadsheet or (scroll to the bottom of the screen) in an interactive chart. I compared daily prices between the US dollar with the Belize Dollarper for the past three months:

  

24/5 is coming!

clock

 

The library will be opening 24/5 from 4 March – 30 March and 22 April – 11 May (to cover the revision period).

This means that from noon on Sunday until 10pm on Friday the Library will be open continuously to give you more time to study, use resources or just find a quiet place to take some time out.

 

 

Request TV and radio programmes from BoB

Box of Broadcasts is a shared off-air recording and media archive service where subscribers (the University of Lincoln is this case) can record forthcoming television and radio programmes as well as retrieving programmes from the previous week.

You can set up an account to request programmes and create clips to embed into Blackboard. Logging into the site on the Portal is slightly unusual – for details see Paul Stainthorp’s blog post:

http://paulstainthorp.com/2010/12/20/logging-on-to-bob/

Zenith Television Set, 1977

Book of the Month: Eats, Shoots and Leaves (2003) by Lynne Truss

Struggling with grammar? Do you know the difference between present and third person indicative’?

Anyone who has watched Monty Python’s The Life of Brian (1979) may know the reference. The brilliant sketch (Romanes Eunt Domus) between a pedantic Roman soldier (John Cleese) and the luckless Brian (Graham Chapman), when Brian is reprimanded after daubing Latin graffiti on a Jerusalem wall, acknowledges the baffling and occasionally obsessive idiosyncracies of proper grammar. Fortunately the surprise bestseller Eats, Shoots & Leaves (2003) by Lynne Truss humorously covers grammar, a subject typically described as the driest place on earth. In Truss’s (2003: 47) efforts to salvage the apostrophe from the dustbin of history she refers to the late, great Keith Waterhouse’s Association for the Abolition of the Aberrant Apostrophe in the Daily Mirror and Daily Mail, printing ‘hundreds of examples of apostrophe horrors, my all-time favourite being the rather subtle, “Prudential – were here to help you”, which looks a bit unsettling until you realise that what it’s supposed to say is, “Prudential – we’re here to help you”.  I found the chapter on ‘The Tractable Apostrophe’ most useful; it was good to refresh my memory, particularly when advising students on grammar as part of Learning Development. The book is available at 421.1 tru on the first floor of the University Library, with plenty of copies furnishing the shelves.

For more definitive guides on English usage, refer to Fowler’s Modern English book, or the useful A Student’s Grammar of the English Language, both stocked in the Library.

Q. What should Brian have written on the wall, instead of Romanes Eunt Domus?

Book of the month: The British on Holiday: Charter Tourism, Identity and Consumption (2011) by Hazel Andrews

The British on Holiday: Charter Tourism, Identity and Consumption (2011) by Hazel Andrews is considered to be a unique ethnographic study of tourists in the Palmanova and Magaluf resorts on the island of Mallorca (incidentally a Catalan spelling of Majorca, it’s more popular name), a predominantly British package holiday destination.

Characterised by fast food outlets with a bawdy reputation as a ‘party’ island and 18-30 club activities, the British have exerted massive cultural influence upon Mallorca typified by pub names like ‘Nutters’ and ‘Diana Beach Bar’. Keenly looking beyond impact of previous studies, Andrews (2011) reflects upon the holiday as a search for a more satisfying life and the aspect of tourist motivation. She discusses the ‘sacred’ ritualisation of the holiday experience as though it is a pilgrimage seeking paradise, even regarding souvenirs as sacred relics. Understanding the regressive childlike behaviour displayed by some tourists, Andrews (2011) explains that their lack of inhibition lends itself towards a Freudian interpretation; a theory which is allegedly supported by travel literature.  Andrews (2011) also explores the notion that someone’s hedonistic fantasy can be another’s Hell, with some sleep deprived tourists wanting to return home early owing to so much noise on the island.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, particularly in trying to understanding the bizarre, and exclusive, concept of Britishness abroad (the supposedly innate need of some tourists to wave the Union Jack on hotel balconies, etc) and Andrews (2011) mega-theory of consumerism and nationalism, deliberately exploited to produce a sense of belonging in British charter tourists. It is amusing (some tourists were not sure if Mallorca was an island!) and thought-provoking because of her interpretation of a wide range theories underpinning tourism studies.

It is available as ebook on the Library Catalogue or as a hard copy in the Library at 910.941 and on the second floor.

Q. Mallorcans have an exceedingly rich history of cuisine; but what is an Arros Brut?

Harvard Referencing Guide

Harvard Referencing Guide

Workshops for Level 1 Accountancy and Finance students next week

We are running workshops for first year Accountancy and Finance students, particularly focusing on Harvard Referencing and finding good quality journal articles.

There’s no need to book – if you are interested in attending, then please just pop along to UL101, the IT lab on the first floor of the Library at the following times:

Monday 23 January        11 – 12

Tuesday 24 January      11 – 12

Wednesday 25 January  11 – 12

Thursday 26 January      11 – 12

Blackwell’s bookshop re-opening on 9th January

Owing to last year’s success, Blackwell’s bookshop will be returning to the Library on Monday 9th January.  Students recieve 5% discount from any purchase.

Core textbooks are stocked as well as secondhand titles.

mad.co.uk changes

Owing to recent subscription changes, we no longer have access to mad.co.uk on the e-library but we retain subscription to its journals, Design Week (available in Business Source Complete and Centaur Communications Limited) and Creative Review  (Business Source Complete and Centaur Communication Limited).

Book of the month: The economics of football (2011)

Discussion about money and football has dominated the headlines since Murdoch’s Sky Sports cash injection into Premier League TV rights during the 90s. Likewise, there’s been a lot of student-led demand for football and business books lately, and one of our latest purchases, Dobson & Goddard’s 2011 popular eBook The economics of football offers academic economic insight into the ‘beautiful game’. There’s so much here for any business student interested in football, not only covering English football, but across the globe, including Germany and Brazil. If you want to learn about determining players’ salaries at the top flight, forecasting models for football match results, game theory and football games, the accumulative match day income of the ‘Big Four’, the much-debated phenomenon of referee behaviour at football matches, measuring managerial influence upon club performance, betting-odds, and of course, the economic impact of the World Cup mega-event, then access this book via the Library Catalogue (www.library.lincoln.ac.uk) search for the title.

Question: Which organisation investigated FIFA after a Panorama documentary exposed alleged bribes?