Becoming a daily reflective practitioner

Yesterday, I submitted a ‘letter to myself’​ to my past self as part of an upcoming event at Lincoln’s Drill Hall. Reflection ought to be embedded into our personal and work lives so that it becomes part of our daily routine. If not, why not? I find that reflective practice helps me change, if not always for the better, I always believe that I’m going forward. Life is about learning afterall. Some criticise that reflection is too backward-looking, turning over historical events in an already over-ploughed field; or simply navel-gazing (at worst). I disagree, but then I would. As Socrates (allegedly) said at his (less than unfortunate) trial: “An un-examined life is not worth living”.

N. B. I’ve embedded these slides from a code I retrieved from my account on Scribd, the document sharing platform. PS. It’s the free version!

Reflective Writing slides by Daren Mansfield on Scribd

Write a ‘letter to myself’ today in the Library

What would you write in a letter to yourself, to either your past, present or future self? I’m taking part in this journey of self-discovery, choosing to write about my past self. Enough there already. It’s taking place today from 11.30-14.30 near the library entrance. There’s even free chocolate. It’s also part of a show at Lincoln’s Drill Hall – if you’re interested, pop along!

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Report writing structure (with literature review)

This is a video I produced as part of the Teaching and Learning in Digital Education course I studied at the University of Lincoln. There are two versions of this video, one with a literature review and one without. This one contains a literature review. Both are available on YouTube.

An onion unpacks the meaning of Mixed Methods research

What does a Mixed Method approach mean? Conveniently, the much-borrowed Saunders & Lewis (2012) textbook carefully unpacks what a mixed methods research approach means via the layers of a onion diagram.

What will you find on ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global?

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Please be advised we now have access to Proquest Dissertations & Theses Global , an addition that replaces the previous much smaller collection of Proquest Dissertations & Theses (UK & Ireland). This resource has been added to our Electronic Journals A-to-Z and Database list. The database also includes a banner of what looks like the swankiest restaurant in the world, no doubt situated in Milan or somewhere similar, and designed to attract the most discerning researcher.

You need to select the “Full Text” option in order to search for entire theses. It’s an astonishing collection: for a full text search on ‘entrepreneurship characteristics’, 43,198 results were recorded; some of which included Mercidee Curry’s Students’ perceptions of entrepreneurship at a historically black university in central Mississippi (Mississippi State University, 2012) and Susan J. Stevenson’s Entrepreneurial characteristics: The phenomenological study of the perceived characteristics that influence women to pursue entrepreneurship (Capella University, 2010). What will you find?

Proquest Dissertations & Theses (UK & Ireland) is a wonderful complement to ETHOS, which is the British Library’s collection of PhD Theses.

 

 

Check out our online Advent calendar today for study tips!

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Check out our online and interactive Advent calendar today for our 25 study tips with the 10th advice coming from Adele Beeken, the Academic Subject Librarian for Chemistry, Engineering, Forensic Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics.

Business School drop-in with your subject Librarian

Hot off the press! A new poster for my Lincoln International Business School drop-in session has just been printed to advertise when I’m sitting at one of the tables near Starbucks on the ground floor of the David Chiddick building from 10-11 am every Wednesday.

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Spelling advice on the Academic Writing site

Poor spelling often discourages potential employers as the chief executive of the National Governors Association announced that some of the top schools in the UK have received high-level job applications containing mistakes of spelling and grammar.

We’re in the process of developing a spelling page on the Academic Writing Support guide which we hope allays some of the fears surrounding this most challenging area. As you’ll notice we’re also starting to buy some books to support our library collection.

http://guides.library.lincoln.ac.uk/c.php?g=133466&p=4025123&preview=72865bdefbb5c004dc39d6c73b8681c8

Think of dictionaries and you may consider browsing  Oxford Dictionaries online (available via library.lincoln.ac.uk > Find > Databases > O > Oxford English Dictionary Online), which contains some useful spelling advice.

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What are “The 7 Approaches to Learning”?

Stella Cottrell, author of many books including the seminal Study Skills Handbook, explains what the 7 Approaches to Learning are in this short video, and covers what independent learning is all about such as devising active learning when you’re studying outside of the classroom so you become a successful and productive student.

Want fast, efficient reading skills? Try targeted reading…

The US comedian and film director Woody Allen once quipped: “I took a speed-reading course and read War and Peace in twenty minutes. It involves Russia.” How to read a pile of journal articles efficiently. It’s a conundrum. The Library is a wealth of information but how do you read fast without missing any of the detail? Andy Gillett’s useful website ‘Using English for Academic Purposes: A Guide for Students in Higher Education’ says that reading involves way more than the use of the eyes and the brain. To read fast, you need to use more of your brain. Reading fast means reading efficiently which means not wasting time and using your eyes and brain together well. To do this, you need to read with purpose and interactively. What Andy means is that we need targetted reading to be successful readers at university. To read more see: http://www.uefap.net/reading/reading-efficiently/reading-efficiently-introduction

 

How do I change my pin number?

If you go to the Library website and then to the Help tab you can easily reset your pin number. Once you’ve done this you’ll receive a confirmation email (check your student email address):

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This answer was also entered onto the Just Ask forum available on the Library website.